This is an awesome opportunity to provide a resource that alleviates the “trial by fire” initiation that new teachers face. It is great to have an organized, detailed, and accessible toolbox of techniques like this.

Testimonials
Getting Students to Care About Their Learning
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      string(3855) "“Students don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care.” ~Anonymous

Most of us chose careers in academia because we care deeply about our disciplines or fields. It can be discouraging, therefore, to face students whose indifference to our courses is palpable. Yet caring is an essential element of their learning. As Fink suggests, “When students care about something, they then have the energy they need for learning more about it and making it a part of their lives. Without the energy for learning, nothing significant happens.” Certainly, common sense and our own experience as teachers suggest that students who really care about what they are learning to invest the time and effort to learn it well and remember it longer.

There is no easy way to get students to care. We offer some suggestions for your consideration:
Be a Role Model For Caring
Students tend to respond to the level of energy and enthusiasm that you generate in kind. If you demonstrate that you are passionate about your subject and about teaching, as well as their learning, your students are more likely to connect with you and with the content and to strive to do their best.
Care About the Students
Most students will be motivated if they believe you care about them. Indeed, caring about the students as individuals is critical to their success as well as to their satisfaction with the course and with your teaching. Getting to know them is helpful on this front, as you can then target instruction to student background and interests.
Set High Expectations
Research is fairly clear that students appreciate it when a teacher has high expectations for them and hold them to it. In short, when they are expected to learn more and perform better, they often do. Students often perform in ways that their teachers expect.
Give Students Ownership in the Content and Process
If students have some flexibility in what they study and how they study it, they are more likely to care about both aspects. For example, if they choose paper and project topics that most interest them, and if they have some decision about the assessment (tests, papers, projects, posters, presentations), they have more control over how they develop understanding and how they demonstrate it to you. Control often leads to caring in this circumstance.
Encourage Students to Connect Content to Their Lives/the Outside World
Oftentimes to students, our courses can seem completely disconnected from their lived experiences. We can find ways to make connections more transparent. When they have the opportunity to see that content is important and relevant to them, they tend to care more.
Choose Assignments That are at the Appropriate Target Level
Students need to have assignments that are challenging enough to be interesting but not so difficult that they feel dazed, confused, and helpless. You can design assignments that are appropriately challenging in view of the experience and aptitude of the class.
Place Appropriate Emphasis on Testing and Grading
Graded items can create incentives or disincentives. You can strive for assessments that show students what they have mastered, rather than what they have not. College teachers can help promote students caring. For information about active learning techniques that promote caring, see our videos for the following techniques: " ["post_title"]=> string(45) "Getting Students to Care About Their Learning" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(45) "getting-students-to-care-about-their-learning" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 17:37:27" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 17:37:27" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(33) "http://kpcrossacademy.org/?p=1286" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [1]=> object(WP_Post)#8003 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(1221) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-12-09 00:42:35" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-12-09 00:42:35" ["post_content"]=> string(4189) "“Knowledge without application is like a book that is never read” ~Christopher Crawford As college teachers, we want students to think deeply about course content and skills, yet sometimes it feels like students never progress beyond surface-level understanding. One of the best ways to help students get to deeper learning is to have them use what they have learned in a new way. In his taxonomy of Significant Learning, Fink (2013) suggests that application means learning how to do some new kind of action. In his taxonomy, Bloom suggests that application means students take what they’ve learned and apply it to a different scenario, often one outside of the classroom. For example, students could use a math formula they’ve learned to calculate a family budget or apply a legal ruling to a specific case in news headlines. To make sure that students show they can apply what they learn, consider the following suggestions:
Be explicit about application
When engaging students in activities that promote the application of knowledge to new contexts, instructors should feel free to make their learning goals and expectations clear. Students will practice application better when they learn to recognize it. They will likely more willingly engage if the instructor explains the benefits of application for future learning and even career aspirations.
Focus on core concepts
Students can more effectively apply knowledge when they comprehend the core principles behind the content and skills that they need to use. You can develop activities to help students develop a deeper understanding of relationships, shared functions, or similar organizing principles prior to asking students to apply the material in new contexts.
Identify sub skills
Asking students to apply what they have learned can sound like a fairly easy task to accomplish, but in reality, it is complicated, and students may not have developed the skills they need to do it well. They need skills in differentiating, classifying, categorizing, organizing, and making attributions. They also need problem solving. It can be useful to scaffold application to highlight the subtasks until students become more comfortable with and clear on their roles and responsibilities.
Provide students with practice
Students develop the ability to apply their learning by practicing application. Instructors can present two different scenarios, formulas, or readings and ask students to find single approaches for solving or analyzing each. Alternately, they can ask students to construct a different problem or scenario that requires the same skills and knowledge as a pre-completed assignment.
Make it social and collaborative
Application of knowledge can be particularly effective when it is done in a cooperative social context that allows peers to develop explanations, provide each other with feedback, and share responsibility for learning. 
Involve students in the process
Students will be more invested in applying what they have learned if they are called upon to mindfully and explicitly search for ways to make connections, to classify, to sort, and so on. Likewise, they will be more invested if called upon to self monitor their progress and success in applying information in new ways. Self-reflection and self-assessment are great tools for accomplishing this goal. For information about active learning techniques that prompt students to apply knowledge, see our videos for the following techniques:  " ["post_title"]=> string(65) "Getting Students to Apply What They Have Learned in a New Context" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(65) "getting-students-to-apply-what-they-have-learned-in-a-new-context" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 17:37:38" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 17:37:38" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(33) "http://kpcrossacademy.org/?p=1221" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [2]=> object(WP_Post)#8005 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(6415) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "5" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2021-10-12 07:00:17" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2021-10-12 14:00:17" ["post_content"]=> string(4436) "
It’s been said that the best tool is the one you actually have with you, but how useful that tool is really comes down to whether or not you know best how to use it. Bearing that in mind, this post is aimed at helping you best utilize the online teaching resources provided by the K. Patricia Cross Academy.
Video Sort Features
With a library of 50 technique videos covering a wide range of subject matter, seeking out a specific video never requires more than a few clicks when using the library’s advanced sorting features.  Even better, the filters are applied in real-time for a smoother browsing experience! Teaching Environment The broadest filter, ‘Teaching Environment’ allows you to select videos based on the intended teaching environment—in-person or online—and is a great way to lend a bit of direction to your general library browsing. Activity Type Do you already have a particular activity type in mind? If you’re looking to approach a certain lesson element in a different way, the ‘Activity Type’ filter allows for efficient browsing and discovery of videos covering activity-specific techniques as well as the resources needed to implement them into your lessons. Teaching Problem Addressed Looking for a way to target a specific issue you’re facing in the classroom? The ‘Teaching Problem Addressed’ filter allows you to find videos directly related to the various teaching challenges you face. Learning Taxonomic Dimension Great for organizing videos based on how they address individual elements of the broader learning process, the ‘Learning Taxonomic Dimension’ filter categorizes the entire video library according to which broader piece of the learning puzzle they address. 
Online Teaching Technique Videos
As the pandemic has dramatically accelerated the adoption of—and reliance on—online learning environments, tailoring teaching techniques to best utilize (and accommodate) the medium has become an essential skill for ensuring teaching and learning do not suffer outside of traditional learning environments. In order to help aid the transition, 38 online teaching technique videos (and counting) have been adapted to offer resources and instruction tailored specifically to the unique considerations presented by teaching and learning in an online environment. 
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    We're Here For You—And The Future of Higher Education
    The K. Patricia Cross Academy is dedicated to supporting faculty in their effort to develop effective, high-impact teaching techniques that improve students' learning through an evidence-based approach.
    Our instructional videos and downloadable resources have been designed to help both faculty and students, and they also represent our continued investment in the future of higher education. We hope these resources will help you in your efforts to teach both effectively and efficiently.
    " ["post_title"]=> string(69) "3 Tips For Making the Most of Cross Academy Online Teaching Resources" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(44) "3-tips-for-making-the-most-of-kpca-resources" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2021-10-12 10:37:30" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2021-10-12 17:37:30" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(34) "https://kpcrossacademy.org/?p=6415" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [3]=> object(WP_Post)#7993 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(2588) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-09-09 11:00:45" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-09-09 11:00:45" ["post_content"]=> string(9963) "

    Higher education institutions have been scrambling to meet the demand for remote and online courses. This has been due in part to general growth trends in online enrollment, but it has also been accelerated out of response to the Covid-19 pandemic. Because of this, we have focused on helping faculty teach more effectively online.

    In this blog, we turn our attention to the learning experiences these courses provide students. Understanding students' experiences in online courses has implications on the effectiveness of teaching strategies. A look at published research shows several factors related to the quality of student experiences that faculty can address when developing their online courses.

    Research on Student Experiences Online

    Instructor Availability and Accessibility

    Instructor accessibility is an important theme that emerges in research on student experiences of online learning. Students who have positive experiences tend to describe instructors as “being there,” “being quick to respond,” “responding within 24 hours,” and “bending over backwards to help.” They also share that instructors who are readily available are helpful to their learning and that they appreciate that these instructors are accessible for answering questions. Students describe these instructors as being clear and as communicating frequently.

    Unfortunately, not all students have positive experiences with their online instructors. Students say their learning suffers when their professors are absent. Students with negative experiences in online learning describe their instructors as, “quite invisible” and “you didn’t see them.” Instructor absence makes students feel that the professors are “not interested in us,” and thus the students are less likely to approach them for help or to ask any questions. This leaves students feeling that their instructor does not think that they or their learning is important.

    Instructors should consider how to make themselves present and available when teaching online.  There are many ways to be there for students in online courses. For example, you can include a welcome, add your bio, contribute to discussions, and give timely feedback on student work.

    Student Time Management

    One of the most valuable skills online students can have is effective time management. The better that students manage their learning time, the easier it is for them to achieve their learning goals. Without the camaraderie of a class to motivate them or having a set time where they need to be on campus, effective time management is crucial to staying focused. Those who have good skills in this area tend to feel prepared for online learning and tend to feel that they can manage and learn online.

    Some students express concern about their abilities to manage their time in online courses, however. When they come into online learning without effective time management skills, they may not remember to log in. They may not work sufficiently in advance to meet deadlines. Indeed, they may forget deadlines altogether. Obviously, lacking these essential skills can have a negative effect on their learning. Having an instructor who can help them, however, can mitigate the lack of skills.

    Instructors should think through how to help students better time manage and how to help them develop the skills to do so. Consider using Lecture Engagement Logs. These are records that guide students in documenting the work they should be doing before, during, and after a lecture, but they can easily be adapted to scaffold work in conjunction with other course activities.

    Lecture Engagement Logs View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:

    Collaborative Learning

    Many students who are learning online want opportunities to connect with peers, and for good reason. One of the challenges students most often describe attending their learning online is the feeling of “isolation.” One student described such feelings as follows:

    I feel isolated; I do not know my fellow learners well and I do not have the courage to phone them, to see if they feel the same distress as me, the same fears. I do not even dare to phone my instructor…The nature of distance learning makes me see everything from a distance.

    Another student in an online course said this, “I haven’t talked with much of anybody this semester” and another said they “didn’t feel connected.” Another put it this way: “I have felt it . . . panic. . . isolation . . . frustration . . . anger.” Instances of isolation are often related to lack of communication or connection in the online classroom. Clearly these feelings can have a negative effect on student learning.

    Students themselves appear to recognize that the social connection is critical to their learning. One student explained it this way:

    It was pretty important to know that there were people out there who were feeling the same thing … It was a little bit scary. I was thinking can I do it; can’t I do it? … This might sound a little bit perverse, but it was reassuring to know that other people were feeling the same thing; that it was quite normal.

    Students recognize that not only is the connection with the instructor important then, but it is also important that they establish and maintain connection with each other.

    So, what is to be done? Collaborative learning involves two or more people working in a group to learn something together. Students who participate in collaborative learning capitalize on one another's knowledge and skills. Usually, students working collaboratively search for understanding or meaning, solutions to problems, or they create a product. Collaborative learning tasks vary widely, but most often, they center on students’ exploration or application of the course material. Collaborative learning, at least on low stakes activities, can be critical in an online course. Consider for example trying a Jigsaw in your online course. In Jigsaw, students work in small groups to develop knowledge about a given topic before teaching what they have learned to another group.

    Jigsaw View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
    Conclusion

    In conclusion, students take online courses for a number of reasons, and in the middle of a global pandemic, one of those reasons is that they simply have to in order to continue their education. Several factors influence their experience, some of which faculty have direct influence over. Instructors should work to establish presence in the absence of physical co-presence, work to help students manage their time and efforts in learning, and strive to create a sense of community.

    Reference:

    Blackmon, S. J. & Major, C. H. (2012). Student experiences in online courses: A qualitative research synthesis. Quarterly Review of Distance Education, 13(2), 77-85.

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    • Anything that involves students in doing things and thinking about the things they are doing (Bonwell & Eison, 1991).
    • A process whereby students engage in activities, such as reading, writing, discussion, or problem solving that promote analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of class content (University of Michigan, Center for Research on Teaching and Learning, 2016)
    • A process of learning through activities and/or discussion in class, as opposed to passively listening to an expert. It emphasizes higher-order thinking and often involves group work (Freeman, et al., 2014).
    We have argued for a broader understanding of active learning than simply associating the term with an instructional approach, activity, or technique in several books in the College Teaching Techniques series. In so doing, we suggested that active learning involves making students dynamic participants in their own learning in ways that require them to integrate new information into their personal knowledge and experience. We suspect that what promotes active learning is different for different learners, but in general, we suggest that students are active learners when they are engaged in their learning in one or more of the following ways.

    Students are active learners when they:

    • Use sophisticated learning strategies
    • Seek deep, conceptual understanding rather than surface knowledge
    • Use learning strategies with personal relevance
    • Use self-regulatory and metacognitive strategies
    • Seek to share personal perspectives
    • Seek to understand others’ perspectives
    • Demonstrate curiosity, interest, and enthusiasm
    • Offer input or suggestions
    •  Seek out additional and further opportunities for learning
    Although active learning can happen anywhere and at any time, we propose that when identifying an approach to promote active learning in a college course, teachers should consider two components: a learning task and a goal for the level of activity involved. By learning task, we mean an academic activity that an instructor has intentionally designed for students to do to help them meet important learning outcomes. We believe that the task can include listening to a lecture; after all, there is a body of work on active listening. The challenge is to make sure that students are using those higher-level listening skills, rather than just hearing the facts. That brings us to our second construct, level of activity, by which we mean students’ mental investment and the strategies they use to reflect on and monitor the processes and the results of their learning. Level of activity is a discrete component because one type of learning task does not necessarily demand more mental investment than another; rather, each type of learning task can require more or less mental activity depending on the individual learner as well as the content and design of the specific task. For example, although some educators argue that students who are listening to a lecture are necessarily learning more passively than those who are solving problems, consider the following problem: X + 3 = 5. Most college students can solve this problem without too much mental activity.
    However, college students who are listening carefully to a highly engaging lecture can have high levels of mental activity, including focused attention, curiosity, empathy, critical thinking, and so forth. Thus, students can have low to high levels of mental activity in any given learning task and any given learning task can require and result in more or less active learning from students.
    We offer our own conception of the active learning continuum for several key learning tasks in the following Table:   Viewed in this way, the term active learning can and should include the learning that can occur when students are listening to a lecture. If students learn something during a lecture, they have been mentally active, whether through listening, remembering, questioning, contemplating, or other. They likely have also been involved in activities such as note-taking, and in our model of interactive lectures, they will participate in additional activities, such as discussing and problem-solving. The challenge, then, is to help students move from level 1 (low) to level 3 (high) on the continuum in terms of their mental activity, whatever the learning task happens to be. So what does this look like online? We suggest that the mechanism itself is much the same as it is onsite. Faculty should choose the task, select a technique that helps students achieve the learning goal with a high level of mental activity (which you can do by sorting our videos by activity type.) To get started, consider the following active learning techniques:
    Active Reading Documents
    Carefully prepared forms that guide students through the process of critical and careful reading. View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
    Online Resource Scavenger Hunt
    Students use the internet to engage in fact-finding and information processing exercises using instructor-specified library and Internet sources. View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
    Quick Write
    Quick Write is a learning assessment technique where learners respond to an open-ended prompt. View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
    Case Studies
    In Case Studies student teams review a real-life problem scenario in depth. Team members apply course concepts to identify and evaluate alternative approaches to solving the problem. View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
    Thus, we encourage faculty who are new to teaching online to put pedagogy first and to be very intentional in their efforts to promote active learning. That is, consider what the learning goal is, what the learning task is, and what technique you can use to accomplish it. After you make these determinations, next you can consider what tool can facilitate your teaching and promote active learning most effectively. To sign up for our newsletter, where you will receive information about new blog posts, click here:

      Reference Barkley, E. F., & Major, C. H. (2018). Interactive lecturing: A handbook for college faculty. San Francisco: Jossey Bass/Wiley." ["post_title"]=> string(48) "4 Techniques to Encourage Active Learning Online" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(22) "active-learning-online" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-12-01 00:11:03" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-12-01 00:11:03" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(34) "https://kpcrossacademy.org/?p=2688" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [5]=> object(WP_Post)#7997 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(472) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2018-11-26 21:34:26" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2018-11-26 21:34:26" ["post_content"]=> string(1524) "Creating or revising a syllabus can be fun. You get to think through what students should learn in the course, what content they will review, what skills they will practice, and what assignments they will complete during the term. One of the most tedious aspects of creating or revising a syllabus, though, is figuring out and filling in the dates each semester, particularly if you have a class that meets, or in the case of online courses has assignments due, multiple times a week. Cue the generic syllabus date finder, created by Caleb McDaniel and hosted on the Rice University Web site at the following URL: http://wcaleb.rice.edu/syllabusmaker/generic/ This simple tool will prompt you to enter the year of your course, the start and end date, and the days on which you will meet (or have work due from students). Once you fill in the relevant information, hitting “submit” will result in a list of dates for the term and will save you the time of having to find them on a calendar. We hope you find this tool useful! As always, if you know of an interesting resource that we should feature, please drop us a line at info@kpcrossacademy.org; we will of course credit you for the information you share." ["post_title"]=> string(31) "It's Not Always in the Syllabus" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(30) "its-not-always-in-the-syllabus" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 17:59:33" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 17:59:33" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(32) "https://kpci.wpengine.com/?p=472" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [6]=> object(WP_Post)#7999 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(3677) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2021-03-10 07:00:03" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2021-03-10 15:00:03" ["post_content"]=> string(8959) "The COVID-19 pandemic and its surrounding political climate find us all in a time of crisis. Teachers and students alike are often caring for family members, friends, and themselves. That students are doing so while continuing their studies demonstrates that they do care, and they likely care deeply, for the people in their lives. But with the distractions brought about during this time of crisis, it can be a challenge for them to focus their care additionally on their studies. As educators, we know there is a strong relationship between caring about learning and quality of learning. As Fink argues, “When students care about something, they then have the energy they need for learning more about it and making it a part of their lives. Without the energy for learning, nothing significant happens” (2013, p. 360). It seems simple common sense that students who really care about what they are learning will invest the time and effort required to learn it well and remember it longer. So how do we help students focus their care on learning, during a crisis, during an age of significant distraction?
      What Does Caring Mean During a Crisis?
      When we care about something, we have acquired an affective disposition toward it that combines concern and perhaps even affection: we value it, appreciate it, and anticipate opportunities to encounter it.  “Caring” in education refers to the degree to which students are interested in, or have feelings about, various aspects of their learning, and it can apply to an array of foci that include topic-specific phenomena and ideas, human beings, and the process of learning itself. It means the focusing of consciousness and the narrowing of attention on learning We often know when students care about their learning. If students care about a course, they will show up for it and will invest appropriate time and energy into the learning activities.  If students care about their peers, they will listen actively when others speak and demonstrate compassion and empathy as they develop deeper understanding of another’s perspectives or experiences. If students care about the topic, they will ask pertinent questions and be sufficiently curious to go beyond the minimum class requirements. How does all this work when they simply don’t have the physical stamina, time, cognitive bandwidth, or emotional energy for the learning?
      How Do We Get Students to Care about Learning during a Crisis?
      Following are suggestions for promoting caring in college and university courses during a crisis: 1. Acknowledge the Crisis and How You are Addressing It. It will help students to care if they know that you care, too, and that you understand where they are coming from. Tell them how you have adapted the course or activities and explain how you hope they will adapt in turn. 2. Humanize the Course. Particularly if you are teaching online, make sure that you have a warm and inviting space for students. You also need to be there and show your personality. Helping students to make connections with you and with each other builds community in the class and can help students to care more about their own work. Being there and forming that community is likely the most essential element of caring in a time of crisis. 3. Reconsider Rigor. Rigor is important, but be sure that you aren’t focusing excessively on it. It’s important to balance rigor with being supportive of students and their learning during this time. Think through how you can provide a quality learning experience during these unique circumstances. Students are more likely to care if they believe that you aren’t out to prove how tough you and the course are, but instead are doing your best to ensure they learn. 4. Make it Manageable. Provide a clear structure and a clear schedule. Give students challenges that increase in difficulty incrementally. One reason that students fail to care is that they believe that they can't or won’t be successful. One way to negate that is to give them small challenges so they can be successful in completing them and then build difficulty and complexity over time. 5. Stay Positive. There are many things to be negative about right now, but your course, content, and student learning aren’t part of that. You can help ensure that students care by staying positive about the learning. Consider using positive language, for example, talking about what they will gain from the course and how they will use it in the future or when we return to the “new normal.” 6. Provide Students with Choice and Autonomy. Provide students with choices so that they feel more invested. For example, you might let students choose which discussions to participate in, or you might give them options about how to participate, for example by sharing something they have created or by responding to a prompt with an essay. 7. Make sure Tasks are Relevant, Appropriate, and Worthy of Their Attention. Characteristics of a learning task can increase or decrease student caring. For example, consider the following questions: Is the task inherently interesting? Is it important to the students on a personal level? Can they make a connection between the task and their own lived experiences? Is there some novelty to it? Is the purpose clear? Is it important to them? Is it a creative activity? Is there enough time to successfully complete the task?
      Cross Academy Techniques to Promote Caring
      Consider the following techniques that promote caring and also provide students with ways to demonstrate caring about the topic or their learning: Three-Minute Message: 3-Minute Messages are modeled on the Three-Minute Thesis (3MT) academic competition, in which students have three minutes to present a compelling argument and to support it with convincing details and examples. View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
      Briefing Paper: In a Briefing Paper, students research a current problem of their choice, summarize the main issues, and present solutions to a specific audience. View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
      What? So What? Now What? Journals: In What? So What? Now What? Journals, students reflect on their recent course-related activities as they respond to each prompt in a journal entry. View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
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        " ["post_title"]=> string(68) "7 Steps to Help Students Care About Learning During a Time of Crisis" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(41) "helping-students-care-in-a-time-of-crisis" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2021-03-10 09:28:09" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2021-03-10 17:28:09" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(34) "https://kpcrossacademy.org/?p=3677" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [7]=> object(WP_Post)#7974 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(2179) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "5" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-07-08 01:39:18" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-07-08 01:39:18" ["post_content"]=> string(11234) "After years - even decades - of teaching onsite, many instructors are able to teach a traditional, classroom-based course without having laid out the entire course in advance. This approach doesn’t work well in the online classroom, however, as online course delivery requires more fully developing the course ahead of time. Thus, when teaching online, the process of course design is essential. Online course design requires a wide range of skills and tools and managing both the design and the technical aspects of the course. A Brief Overview of Online Course Design When engaging in course design, the concept of instructional alignment is useful to consider. Instructional alignment begins with the identification of learning goals. Those goals then direct other decisions, including how you will help students achieve these goals (materials and methods), what tools can best help you help students achieve them (technologies), and how you will know if the goals have been met (assessment). We illustrate the idea of instructional alignment in online courses in the following figure: In this model, one element leads to the next. For example, if you are teaching an English class, you might have a learning goal of critical thinking, with a specific objective that learners will critically evaluate a play. Your learning materials might include the specific play to be evaluated as well as an article or chapter describing a model of critical evaluation. For your learning activities, you might ask learners to read the materials and then practice critical evaluation through Active Reading Documents in which your questions lead students through a critical analysis that prepares them to then write a report on their own. For the technology, you might use a Learning Management System (LMS) and have the materials available within it as well as a downloadable template for the Active Reading Documents. For the assessment, students might write a formal report using the evaluation model to critically evaluate the play. All of these key elements in the instructional alignment model should be determined before an online course goes live. The following are tips related to instructional alignment during course design. 1. Develop Course and Module Learning Goals and Objectives Most of us are familiar with the idea of developing course goals and objectives; after all, we usually have to include course level goals and objectives in every syllabus we create. But not all of us are as familiar with developing goals for specific learning modules. When we teach online, developing, and then displaying more targeted micro-goals for specific modules helps make our learning expectations clear. 2. Use Multiple Media for Learning Materials Traditionally, many of us share content by asking students to read a chapter or article and then we elaborate by presenting additional content through lectures. We can accomplish these forms of sharing content in similar ways online. Many resources are available to present text versions of lectures, and we can also present either synchronous lectures through video conferencing or asynchronous pre-recorded video lectures online. In addition, there are a range of free resources available online, such as pre-recorded videos and free open educational resources (OERs). A mix of media (text, video, audio, graphics) is typically more effective than using only one type because the variety can help keep students more engaged. 3. Choose Appropriate Learning Tasks It is important to think through what students will do in your online course. Common instructional tasks in online courses include the following:
        • Connect—Activate students’ prior knowledge of the content so that learners can make better connections to new content through an activity such as a Background Knowledge Probe.
        • Learn/Watch/Read— Provide learners with the new content.
        • Practice—Implement activities that reinforce their new learning.
        • Share/Discuss—Enable students to find personal relevance and share their experiences with their peers, perhaps through a discussion thread. Consider for example using a Think-Pair-Share.
        • Assess—Ask students to demonstrate learning, whether through a quiz, assignment, project, or other.
        • Reflect— Challenge students to reflect on what they have learned.
        Aim for having the same kinds of activities due on the same days of the week. If for example, you do a discussion board each week, choose the day when students will post (for example have discussions due on Wednesday and responses due on Friday). If they have an assessment to complete each week, choose a different due day for that activity (for example, have the assessment due on Thursday), and so forth. 4. Humanize the Technology Technology can serve as a mediator between people. A few suggestions for accomplishing this are as follows:
        • Simplify the NavigationMany Learning Management Systems make choices for you, including what will be in the navigation bar. Think through how students will work their way through the course and what students really need to see in the navigation menu. Unnecessary items can result in overwhelmed students. Providing clarity and ensuring intuitive organization of materials can improve learner satisfaction as well as promoting deeper learning.
        • Strive for a Humanized Look and FeelThere is a tendency in online courses to use built-in icons and heavy text. Graphics, images, and short videos can create a warmer look and a more human-friendly feel to the course.
        • Ensure Accessibility—Effective online courses should be accessible to all learners. One way to do this is to make sure courses are “universally designed.” Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is built on the idea that all learning experiences should be purposefully constructed to be “barrier free” and accessible by providing multiple and flexible methods of the following elements:
          • Presentation of content (e.g., voice-to-text applications, screen readers, digital books).
          • Alternatives for students to demonstrate what they have learned (e.g., concept mapping).
          • Engagement to tap into diverse learners’ interests, challenge them appropriately, and motivate them to learn (choices among various scenarios for learning the same competency).
        5. Include Multiple Learning Assessments While one assessment alone can generate evidence to make decisions about student learning and development, multiple measures encourage more comprehensive and accurate assessment. This benefits not only the students who are learning but also the instructors who are doing the teaching. Consider the following learning artifacts commonly used to assess student learning in online courses.
        • Discussion Posts
        • Groupwork Products
        • Quizzes
        • Exams
        • Written or Video Assignments
        • Digital Projects or Portfolios
        Consider providing students with choices for assignments, such as what to write about for the assignment or how to respond to a discussion post or even which assignments they will complete. In conclusion, online course design requires concerted time and attention. To summarize some of the key points we have described, we have further developed our instructional alignment figure for online courses as follows: Try incorporating these teaching techniques into your online course design.

        Background Knowledge Probe

        View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:

        Think Pair Share

        View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:

        Active Reading Documents

        View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
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        Enter your email below to receive information about new blog posts.

          " ["post_title"]=> string(40) "5 Tips for Engaging Online Course Design" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(29) "engaging-online-course-design" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-07-10 00:53:56" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-07-10 00:53:56" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(34) "https://kpcrossacademy.org/?p=2179" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [8]=> object(WP_Post)#7930 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(816) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "4" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-05-09 19:26:20" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-05-09 19:26:20" ["post_content"]=> string(1570) "“Learning is not attained by chance, it must be sought for with ardor and attended to with diligence.” ~ Abigal Adams One of the most often cited works on learning, and one we refer to often, is John Bransford, Ann Brown, and Rodney Cocking’s 2000 work appropriately titled How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School. The report, which was commissioned by the National Research Council, presents research in cognitive science and connects the findings to implications for teaching and learning. You can find the full report, all 374 pages of it, here: https://www.nap.edu/read/9853/chapter/1 Helpfully, the staff at the Center for Teaching at Vanderbilt University have developed a teaching guide with highlights from the report. For their summary, see the following link: https://cft.vanderbilt.edu//cft/guides-sub-pages/how-people-learn/ The CFT staff hone in on the nature of expertise and the challenges students face as they seek to develop expertise. The staff suggest that teachers should seek to gauge student levels of knowledge and that we should also make our thinking visible to students so that we are modeling our expertise. We hope that you find these resources helpful. As always, if you know of an interesting resource that we should feature, please drop us a line at info@kpcrossacademy.org; we will of course credit you for the information you share.  " ["post_title"]=> string(14) "How They Learn" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(14) "how-they-learn" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 17:38:41" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 17:38:41" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(32) "http://kpcrossacademy.org/?p=816" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [9]=> object(WP_Post)#7648 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(1575) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "4" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 02:42:22" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 02:42:22" ["post_content"]=> string(9211) "The COVID-19 pandemic has led to many if not most college faculty teaching in virtual classrooms. While many of us are turning to synchronous lectures with video conferencing tools such as Zoom or Blackboard Collaborate, many of us are also choosing to create asynchronous video lectures that students can watch anytime, anywhere. There are many valid reasons for making this teach-from-home choice; among them are some students may have difficulty accessing synchronous class activities—they may be living in a different time zone, have limited internet access, among other reasons. The benefits of an asynchronous e-classroom setup, beyond time and place flexibility, include the fact that students can scan, search, and re-watch lectures. Moreover, as faculty, you have the luxury of time to think fully through what you are going to say ahead of time and afterward, to edit the videos so that you produce the best e-lecture product possible. A few effective ways to use asynchronous videos are:
          • A welcome video
          • An introduction to a topic or module
          • A demonstration
          • A description of a difficult concept
          • A synthesis of material from the learning module or unit
          A few choices that you have for creating videos at home on your phone or laptop are as follows:
          • Narrated slide presentation. In this video format, slides are the only thing visible in the video. The teacher does a voiceover to accompany the slides. These are useful for presenting complicated material for which visuals will likely enhance students’ understanding. PowerPoint has a built-in feature for recording over slides, but it can be clunky to have to click play between each slide. A better option is to export to YouTube or Vimeo or use a screencast program such as Screencastomatic or Screencastify that you can also share to YouTube or Vimeo.
          • Presenter-only lecture. In this kind of lecture, the instructor appears without other visual supports. This approach can make the instructor appear as a mere talking head if overdone. But they can be useful in short segments to add teacher presence to the course and help students feel like you are “there.” These can be done in a fairly low-tech way, such as through a smartphone video, Zoom, or Blackboard Collaborate recording done ahead of time.
          • Slide presentation with presenter view. This approach is a combination of presenter and slide presentation, which allows you to capitalize on the benefits of both approaches. Programs such as Panopto and Tegrity provide a professional look, but you can also record in Zoom or other video conferencing programs ahead of time.
          To create the most engaging asynchronous video presentations possible, be sure that you attend to the following issues:
          1. Lighting: Make sure that you have ample lighting and that the light hits your face rather than coming from behind you.
          2. Storyboards: If you are doing the lecture for the first time, consider creating a storyboard, which is simply a plan of what you will say, show, and describe. A good storyboard can provide you with a roadmap. Feel free to download and use our template.
          3. Scripts: Develop a script of what you will say to ensure that you address the most important content. You can then use the script as the transcript of the video for accessibility purposes. If you would like to be more impromptu in your approach but need to create a transcript, consider using a program like Zoom that will allow you to record and change the settings to prepare a transcript, which you can then edit.
          4. Slide Design. See our blog post on creating engaging synchronous lectures for tips on effective slide design for video lectures.
          5. Copyright: Because your video will be tangible and long lasting, you need to ensure that you have permission to use all images, video, music, or other content that is not your own. You can find many free images and music through sources such as Creative Commons, Unsplash, or Pixabay. Just be sure to give credit where credit is due.
          6. Shelf-Life: You may well want to use the video you create in the future, and you will be better able to do so if you are attentive to the shelf life of your content. While it may be virtually impossible not to mention the Coronavirus pandemic, consider limiting such references so that you are able to edit the information out later.
          7. Learning Chunks: It is exceedingly difficult to watch long lectures, particularly on video. Try to break your lectures into no more than 10-minute chunks per video. If you simply cannot do this, consider asking students to stop the video to complete a task every 10 minutes.
          8. Active Learning: While the video will be asynchronous, you can and should still expect students to learn actively while they are watching. Consider implementing the following techniques in your online class to break up your asynchronous video lecture and keep your students active and engaged:
          • Guided Notes | View Technique →
          • Quick WriteView Technique →
          " ["post_title"]=> string(65) "Creating Engaging Asynchronous Lectures With Your Phone or Laptop" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(39) "creating-engaging-asynchronous-lectures" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-05-19 16:42:33" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-05-19 16:42:33" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(33) "http://kpcrossacademy.org/?p=1575" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } } ["post_count"]=> int(10) ["current_post"]=> int(0) ["in_the_loop"]=> bool(true) ["post"]=> object(WP_Post)#8040 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(1286) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-01-06 19:11:53" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-01-06 19:11:53" ["post_content"]=> string(3855) "“Students don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care.” ~Anonymous Most of us chose careers in academia because we care deeply about our disciplines or fields. It can be discouraging, therefore, to face students whose indifference to our courses is palpable. Yet caring is an essential element of their learning. As Fink suggests, “When students care about something, they then have the energy they need for learning more about it and making it a part of their lives. Without the energy for learning, nothing significant happens.” Certainly, common sense and our own experience as teachers suggest that students who really care about what they are learning to invest the time and effort to learn it well and remember it longer. There is no easy way to get students to care. We offer some suggestions for your consideration:
          Be a Role Model For Caring
          Students tend to respond to the level of energy and enthusiasm that you generate in kind. If you demonstrate that you are passionate about your subject and about teaching, as well as their learning, your students are more likely to connect with you and with the content and to strive to do their best.
          Care About the Students
          Most students will be motivated if they believe you care about them. Indeed, caring about the students as individuals is critical to their success as well as to their satisfaction with the course and with your teaching. Getting to know them is helpful on this front, as you can then target instruction to student background and interests.
          Set High Expectations
          Research is fairly clear that students appreciate it when a teacher has high expectations for them and hold them to it. In short, when they are expected to learn more and perform better, they often do. Students often perform in ways that their teachers expect.
          Give Students Ownership in the Content and Process
          If students have some flexibility in what they study and how they study it, they are more likely to care about both aspects. For example, if they choose paper and project topics that most interest them, and if they have some decision about the assessment (tests, papers, projects, posters, presentations), they have more control over how they develop understanding and how they demonstrate it to you. Control often leads to caring in this circumstance.
          Encourage Students to Connect Content to Their Lives/the Outside World
          Oftentimes to students, our courses can seem completely disconnected from their lived experiences. We can find ways to make connections more transparent. When they have the opportunity to see that content is important and relevant to them, they tend to care more.
          Choose Assignments That are at the Appropriate Target Level
          Students need to have assignments that are challenging enough to be interesting but not so difficult that they feel dazed, confused, and helpless. You can design assignments that are appropriately challenging in view of the experience and aptitude of the class.
          Place Appropriate Emphasis on Testing and Grading
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          Getting Students to Apply What They Have Learned in a New Context
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                string(3855) "“Students don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care.” ~Anonymous
          
          Most of us chose careers in academia because we care deeply about our disciplines or fields. It can be discouraging, therefore, to face students whose indifference to our courses is palpable. Yet caring is an essential element of their learning. As Fink suggests, “When students care about something, they then have the energy they need for learning more about it and making it a part of their lives. Without the energy for learning, nothing significant happens.” Certainly, common sense and our own experience as teachers suggest that students who really care about what they are learning to invest the time and effort to learn it well and remember it longer.
          
          There is no easy way to get students to care. We offer some suggestions for your consideration:
          
          Be a Role Model For Caring
          Students tend to respond to the level of energy and enthusiasm that you generate in kind. If you demonstrate that you are passionate about your subject and about teaching, as well as their learning, your students are more likely to connect with you and with the content and to strive to do their best.
          Care About the Students
          Most students will be motivated if they believe you care about them. Indeed, caring about the students as individuals is critical to their success as well as to their satisfaction with the course and with your teaching. Getting to know them is helpful on this front, as you can then target instruction to student background and interests.
          Set High Expectations
          Research is fairly clear that students appreciate it when a teacher has high expectations for them and hold them to it. In short, when they are expected to learn more and perform better, they often do. Students often perform in ways that their teachers expect.
          Give Students Ownership in the Content and Process
          If students have some flexibility in what they study and how they study it, they are more likely to care about both aspects. For example, if they choose paper and project topics that most interest them, and if they have some decision about the assessment (tests, papers, projects, posters, presentations), they have more control over how they develop understanding and how they demonstrate it to you. Control often leads to caring in this circumstance.
          Encourage Students to Connect Content to Their Lives/the Outside World
          Oftentimes to students, our courses can seem completely disconnected from their lived experiences. We can find ways to make connections more transparent. When they have the opportunity to see that content is important and relevant to them, they tend to care more.
          Choose Assignments That are at the Appropriate Target Level
          Students need to have assignments that are challenging enough to be interesting but not so difficult that they feel dazed, confused, and helpless. You can design assignments that are appropriately challenging in view of the experience and aptitude of the class.
          Place Appropriate Emphasis on Testing and Grading
          Graded items can create incentives or disincentives. You can strive for assessments that show students what they have mastered, rather than what they have not. College teachers can help promote students caring. For information about active learning techniques that promote caring, see our videos for the following techniques: " ["post_title"]=> string(45) "Getting Students to Care About Their Learning" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(45) "getting-students-to-care-about-their-learning" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 17:37:27" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 17:37:27" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(33) "http://kpcrossacademy.org/?p=1286" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [1]=> object(WP_Post)#8003 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(1221) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-12-09 00:42:35" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-12-09 00:42:35" ["post_content"]=> string(4189) "“Knowledge without application is like a book that is never read” ~Christopher Crawford As college teachers, we want students to think deeply about course content and skills, yet sometimes it feels like students never progress beyond surface-level understanding. One of the best ways to help students get to deeper learning is to have them use what they have learned in a new way. In his taxonomy of Significant Learning, Fink (2013) suggests that application means learning how to do some new kind of action. In his taxonomy, Bloom suggests that application means students take what they’ve learned and apply it to a different scenario, often one outside of the classroom. For example, students could use a math formula they’ve learned to calculate a family budget or apply a legal ruling to a specific case in news headlines. To make sure that students show they can apply what they learn, consider the following suggestions:
          Be explicit about application
          When engaging students in activities that promote the application of knowledge to new contexts, instructors should feel free to make their learning goals and expectations clear. Students will practice application better when they learn to recognize it. They will likely more willingly engage if the instructor explains the benefits of application for future learning and even career aspirations.
          Focus on core concepts
          Students can more effectively apply knowledge when they comprehend the core principles behind the content and skills that they need to use. You can develop activities to help students develop a deeper understanding of relationships, shared functions, or similar organizing principles prior to asking students to apply the material in new contexts.
          Identify sub skills
          Asking students to apply what they have learned can sound like a fairly easy task to accomplish, but in reality, it is complicated, and students may not have developed the skills they need to do it well. They need skills in differentiating, classifying, categorizing, organizing, and making attributions. They also need problem solving. It can be useful to scaffold application to highlight the subtasks until students become more comfortable with and clear on their roles and responsibilities.
          Provide students with practice
          Students develop the ability to apply their learning by practicing application. Instructors can present two different scenarios, formulas, or readings and ask students to find single approaches for solving or analyzing each. Alternately, they can ask students to construct a different problem or scenario that requires the same skills and knowledge as a pre-completed assignment.
          Make it social and collaborative
          Application of knowledge can be particularly effective when it is done in a cooperative social context that allows peers to develop explanations, provide each other with feedback, and share responsibility for learning. 
          Involve students in the process
          Students will be more invested in applying what they have learned if they are called upon to mindfully and explicitly search for ways to make connections, to classify, to sort, and so on. Likewise, they will be more invested if called upon to self monitor their progress and success in applying information in new ways. Self-reflection and self-assessment are great tools for accomplishing this goal. For information about active learning techniques that prompt students to apply knowledge, see our videos for the following techniques:  " ["post_title"]=> string(65) "Getting Students to Apply What They Have Learned in a New Context" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(65) "getting-students-to-apply-what-they-have-learned-in-a-new-context" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 17:37:38" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 17:37:38" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(33) "http://kpcrossacademy.org/?p=1221" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [2]=> object(WP_Post)#8005 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(6415) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "5" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2021-10-12 07:00:17" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2021-10-12 14:00:17" ["post_content"]=> string(4436) "
          It’s been said that the best tool is the one you actually have with you, but how useful that tool is really comes down to whether or not you know best how to use it. Bearing that in mind, this post is aimed at helping you best utilize the online teaching resources provided by the K. Patricia Cross Academy.
          Video Sort Features
          With a library of 50 technique videos covering a wide range of subject matter, seeking out a specific video never requires more than a few clicks when using the library’s advanced sorting features.  Even better, the filters are applied in real-time for a smoother browsing experience! Teaching Environment The broadest filter, ‘Teaching Environment’ allows you to select videos based on the intended teaching environment—in-person or online—and is a great way to lend a bit of direction to your general library browsing. Activity Type Do you already have a particular activity type in mind? If you’re looking to approach a certain lesson element in a different way, the ‘Activity Type’ filter allows for efficient browsing and discovery of videos covering activity-specific techniques as well as the resources needed to implement them into your lessons. Teaching Problem Addressed Looking for a way to target a specific issue you’re facing in the classroom? The ‘Teaching Problem Addressed’ filter allows you to find videos directly related to the various teaching challenges you face. Learning Taxonomic Dimension Great for organizing videos based on how they address individual elements of the broader learning process, the ‘Learning Taxonomic Dimension’ filter categorizes the entire video library according to which broader piece of the learning puzzle they address. 
          Online Teaching Technique Videos
          As the pandemic has dramatically accelerated the adoption of—and reliance on—online learning environments, tailoring teaching techniques to best utilize (and accommodate) the medium has become an essential skill for ensuring teaching and learning do not suffer outside of traditional learning environments. In order to help aid the transition, 38 online teaching technique videos (and counting) have been adapted to offer resources and instruction tailored specifically to the unique considerations presented by teaching and learning in an online environment. 
          Subscribe to Our Newsletter
          From topical insights on the issues facing today’s educators to more detailed discussions of some of the finer points of various teaching techniques, our monthly newsletter has been designed to deliver a wealth of tips, strategies, and knowledge directly to your inbox for FREE!

            We're Here For You—And The Future of Higher Education
            The K. Patricia Cross Academy is dedicated to supporting faculty in their effort to develop effective, high-impact teaching techniques that improve students' learning through an evidence-based approach.
            Our instructional videos and downloadable resources have been designed to help both faculty and students, and they also represent our continued investment in the future of higher education. We hope these resources will help you in your efforts to teach both effectively and efficiently.
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            Higher education institutions have been scrambling to meet the demand for remote and online courses. This has been due in part to general growth trends in online enrollment, but it has also been accelerated out of response to the Covid-19 pandemic. Because of this, we have focused on helping faculty teach more effectively online.

            In this blog, we turn our attention to the learning experiences these courses provide students. Understanding students' experiences in online courses has implications on the effectiveness of teaching strategies. A look at published research shows several factors related to the quality of student experiences that faculty can address when developing their online courses.

            Research on Student Experiences Online

            Instructor Availability and Accessibility

            Instructor accessibility is an important theme that emerges in research on student experiences of online learning. Students who have positive experiences tend to describe instructors as “being there,” “being quick to respond,” “responding within 24 hours,” and “bending over backwards to help.” They also share that instructors who are readily available are helpful to their learning and that they appreciate that these instructors are accessible for answering questions. Students describe these instructors as being clear and as communicating frequently.

            Unfortunately, not all students have positive experiences with their online instructors. Students say their learning suffers when their professors are absent. Students with negative experiences in online learning describe their instructors as, “quite invisible” and “you didn’t see them.” Instructor absence makes students feel that the professors are “not interested in us,” and thus the students are less likely to approach them for help or to ask any questions. This leaves students feeling that their instructor does not think that they or their learning is important.

            Instructors should consider how to make themselves present and available when teaching online.  There are many ways to be there for students in online courses. For example, you can include a welcome, add your bio, contribute to discussions, and give timely feedback on student work.

            Student Time Management

            One of the most valuable skills online students can have is effective time management. The better that students manage their learning time, the easier it is for them to achieve their learning goals. Without the camaraderie of a class to motivate them or having a set time where they need to be on campus, effective time management is crucial to staying focused. Those who have good skills in this area tend to feel prepared for online learning and tend to feel that they can manage and learn online.

            Some students express concern about their abilities to manage their time in online courses, however. When they come into online learning without effective time management skills, they may not remember to log in. They may not work sufficiently in advance to meet deadlines. Indeed, they may forget deadlines altogether. Obviously, lacking these essential skills can have a negative effect on their learning. Having an instructor who can help them, however, can mitigate the lack of skills.

            Instructors should think through how to help students better time manage and how to help them develop the skills to do so. Consider using Lecture Engagement Logs. These are records that guide students in documenting the work they should be doing before, during, and after a lecture, but they can easily be adapted to scaffold work in conjunction with other course activities.

            Lecture Engagement Logs View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:

            Collaborative Learning

            Many students who are learning online want opportunities to connect with peers, and for good reason. One of the challenges students most often describe attending their learning online is the feeling of “isolation.” One student described such feelings as follows:

            I feel isolated; I do not know my fellow learners well and I do not have the courage to phone them, to see if they feel the same distress as me, the same fears. I do not even dare to phone my instructor…The nature of distance learning makes me see everything from a distance.

            Another student in an online course said this, “I haven’t talked with much of anybody this semester” and another said they “didn’t feel connected.” Another put it this way: “I have felt it . . . panic. . . isolation . . . frustration . . . anger.” Instances of isolation are often related to lack of communication or connection in the online classroom. Clearly these feelings can have a negative effect on student learning.

            Students themselves appear to recognize that the social connection is critical to their learning. One student explained it this way:

            It was pretty important to know that there were people out there who were feeling the same thing … It was a little bit scary. I was thinking can I do it; can’t I do it? … This might sound a little bit perverse, but it was reassuring to know that other people were feeling the same thing; that it was quite normal.

            Students recognize that not only is the connection with the instructor important then, but it is also important that they establish and maintain connection with each other.

            So, what is to be done? Collaborative learning involves two or more people working in a group to learn something together. Students who participate in collaborative learning capitalize on one another's knowledge and skills. Usually, students working collaboratively search for understanding or meaning, solutions to problems, or they create a product. Collaborative learning tasks vary widely, but most often, they center on students’ exploration or application of the course material. Collaborative learning, at least on low stakes activities, can be critical in an online course. Consider for example trying a Jigsaw in your online course. In Jigsaw, students work in small groups to develop knowledge about a given topic before teaching what they have learned to another group.

            Jigsaw View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
            Conclusion

            In conclusion, students take online courses for a number of reasons, and in the middle of a global pandemic, one of those reasons is that they simply have to in order to continue their education. Several factors influence their experience, some of which faculty have direct influence over. Instructors should work to establish presence in the absence of physical co-presence, work to help students manage their time and efforts in learning, and strive to create a sense of community.

            Reference:

            Blackmon, S. J. & Major, C. H. (2012). Student experiences in online courses: A qualitative research synthesis. Quarterly Review of Distance Education, 13(2), 77-85.

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            • Anything that involves students in doing things and thinking about the things they are doing (Bonwell & Eison, 1991).
            • A process whereby students engage in activities, such as reading, writing, discussion, or problem solving that promote analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of class content (University of Michigan, Center for Research on Teaching and Learning, 2016)
            • A process of learning through activities and/or discussion in class, as opposed to passively listening to an expert. It emphasizes higher-order thinking and often involves group work (Freeman, et al., 2014).
            We have argued for a broader understanding of active learning than simply associating the term with an instructional approach, activity, or technique in several books in the College Teaching Techniques series. In so doing, we suggested that active learning involves making students dynamic participants in their own learning in ways that require them to integrate new information into their personal knowledge and experience. We suspect that what promotes active learning is different for different learners, but in general, we suggest that students are active learners when they are engaged in their learning in one or more of the following ways.

            Students are active learners when they:

            • Use sophisticated learning strategies
            • Seek deep, conceptual understanding rather than surface knowledge
            • Use learning strategies with personal relevance
            • Use self-regulatory and metacognitive strategies
            • Seek to share personal perspectives
            • Seek to understand others’ perspectives
            • Demonstrate curiosity, interest, and enthusiasm
            • Offer input or suggestions
            •  Seek out additional and further opportunities for learning
            Although active learning can happen anywhere and at any time, we propose that when identifying an approach to promote active learning in a college course, teachers should consider two components: a learning task and a goal for the level of activity involved. By learning task, we mean an academic activity that an instructor has intentionally designed for students to do to help them meet important learning outcomes. We believe that the task can include listening to a lecture; after all, there is a body of work on active listening. The challenge is to make sure that students are using those higher-level listening skills, rather than just hearing the facts. That brings us to our second construct, level of activity, by which we mean students’ mental investment and the strategies they use to reflect on and monitor the processes and the results of their learning. Level of activity is a discrete component because one type of learning task does not necessarily demand more mental investment than another; rather, each type of learning task can require more or less mental activity depending on the individual learner as well as the content and design of the specific task. For example, although some educators argue that students who are listening to a lecture are necessarily learning more passively than those who are solving problems, consider the following problem: X + 3 = 5. Most college students can solve this problem without too much mental activity.
            However, college students who are listening carefully to a highly engaging lecture can have high levels of mental activity, including focused attention, curiosity, empathy, critical thinking, and so forth. Thus, students can have low to high levels of mental activity in any given learning task and any given learning task can require and result in more or less active learning from students.
            We offer our own conception of the active learning continuum for several key learning tasks in the following Table:   Viewed in this way, the term active learning can and should include the learning that can occur when students are listening to a lecture. If students learn something during a lecture, they have been mentally active, whether through listening, remembering, questioning, contemplating, or other. They likely have also been involved in activities such as note-taking, and in our model of interactive lectures, they will participate in additional activities, such as discussing and problem-solving. The challenge, then, is to help students move from level 1 (low) to level 3 (high) on the continuum in terms of their mental activity, whatever the learning task happens to be. So what does this look like online? We suggest that the mechanism itself is much the same as it is onsite. Faculty should choose the task, select a technique that helps students achieve the learning goal with a high level of mental activity (which you can do by sorting our videos by activity type.) To get started, consider the following active learning techniques:
            Active Reading Documents
            Carefully prepared forms that guide students through the process of critical and careful reading. View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
            Online Resource Scavenger Hunt
            Students use the internet to engage in fact-finding and information processing exercises using instructor-specified library and Internet sources. View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
            Quick Write
            Quick Write is a learning assessment technique where learners respond to an open-ended prompt. View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
            Case Studies
            In Case Studies student teams review a real-life problem scenario in depth. Team members apply course concepts to identify and evaluate alternative approaches to solving the problem. View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
            Thus, we encourage faculty who are new to teaching online to put pedagogy first and to be very intentional in their efforts to promote active learning. That is, consider what the learning goal is, what the learning task is, and what technique you can use to accomplish it. After you make these determinations, next you can consider what tool can facilitate your teaching and promote active learning most effectively. To sign up for our newsletter, where you will receive information about new blog posts, click here:

              Reference Barkley, E. F., & Major, C. H. (2018). Interactive lecturing: A handbook for college faculty. San Francisco: Jossey Bass/Wiley." ["post_title"]=> string(48) "4 Techniques to Encourage Active Learning Online" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(22) "active-learning-online" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-12-01 00:11:03" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-12-01 00:11:03" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(34) "https://kpcrossacademy.org/?p=2688" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [5]=> object(WP_Post)#7997 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(472) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2018-11-26 21:34:26" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2018-11-26 21:34:26" ["post_content"]=> string(1524) "Creating or revising a syllabus can be fun. You get to think through what students should learn in the course, what content they will review, what skills they will practice, and what assignments they will complete during the term. One of the most tedious aspects of creating or revising a syllabus, though, is figuring out and filling in the dates each semester, particularly if you have a class that meets, or in the case of online courses has assignments due, multiple times a week. Cue the generic syllabus date finder, created by Caleb McDaniel and hosted on the Rice University Web site at the following URL: http://wcaleb.rice.edu/syllabusmaker/generic/ This simple tool will prompt you to enter the year of your course, the start and end date, and the days on which you will meet (or have work due from students). Once you fill in the relevant information, hitting “submit” will result in a list of dates for the term and will save you the time of having to find them on a calendar. We hope you find this tool useful! As always, if you know of an interesting resource that we should feature, please drop us a line at info@kpcrossacademy.org; we will of course credit you for the information you share." ["post_title"]=> string(31) "It's Not Always in the Syllabus" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(30) "its-not-always-in-the-syllabus" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 17:59:33" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 17:59:33" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(32) "https://kpci.wpengine.com/?p=472" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [6]=> object(WP_Post)#7999 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(3677) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2021-03-10 07:00:03" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2021-03-10 15:00:03" ["post_content"]=> string(8959) "The COVID-19 pandemic and its surrounding political climate find us all in a time of crisis. Teachers and students alike are often caring for family members, friends, and themselves. That students are doing so while continuing their studies demonstrates that they do care, and they likely care deeply, for the people in their lives. But with the distractions brought about during this time of crisis, it can be a challenge for them to focus their care additionally on their studies. As educators, we know there is a strong relationship between caring about learning and quality of learning. As Fink argues, “When students care about something, they then have the energy they need for learning more about it and making it a part of their lives. Without the energy for learning, nothing significant happens” (2013, p. 360). It seems simple common sense that students who really care about what they are learning will invest the time and effort required to learn it well and remember it longer. So how do we help students focus their care on learning, during a crisis, during an age of significant distraction?
              What Does Caring Mean During a Crisis?
              When we care about something, we have acquired an affective disposition toward it that combines concern and perhaps even affection: we value it, appreciate it, and anticipate opportunities to encounter it.  “Caring” in education refers to the degree to which students are interested in, or have feelings about, various aspects of their learning, and it can apply to an array of foci that include topic-specific phenomena and ideas, human beings, and the process of learning itself. It means the focusing of consciousness and the narrowing of attention on learning We often know when students care about their learning. If students care about a course, they will show up for it and will invest appropriate time and energy into the learning activities.  If students care about their peers, they will listen actively when others speak and demonstrate compassion and empathy as they develop deeper understanding of another’s perspectives or experiences. If students care about the topic, they will ask pertinent questions and be sufficiently curious to go beyond the minimum class requirements. How does all this work when they simply don’t have the physical stamina, time, cognitive bandwidth, or emotional energy for the learning?
              How Do We Get Students to Care about Learning during a Crisis?
              Following are suggestions for promoting caring in college and university courses during a crisis: 1. Acknowledge the Crisis and How You are Addressing It. It will help students to care if they know that you care, too, and that you understand where they are coming from. Tell them how you have adapted the course or activities and explain how you hope they will adapt in turn. 2. Humanize the Course. Particularly if you are teaching online, make sure that you have a warm and inviting space for students. You also need to be there and show your personality. Helping students to make connections with you and with each other builds community in the class and can help students to care more about their own work. Being there and forming that community is likely the most essential element of caring in a time of crisis. 3. Reconsider Rigor. Rigor is important, but be sure that you aren’t focusing excessively on it. It’s important to balance rigor with being supportive of students and their learning during this time. Think through how you can provide a quality learning experience during these unique circumstances. Students are more likely to care if they believe that you aren’t out to prove how tough you and the course are, but instead are doing your best to ensure they learn. 4. Make it Manageable. Provide a clear structure and a clear schedule. Give students challenges that increase in difficulty incrementally. One reason that students fail to care is that they believe that they can't or won’t be successful. One way to negate that is to give them small challenges so they can be successful in completing them and then build difficulty and complexity over time. 5. Stay Positive. There are many things to be negative about right now, but your course, content, and student learning aren’t part of that. You can help ensure that students care by staying positive about the learning. Consider using positive language, for example, talking about what they will gain from the course and how they will use it in the future or when we return to the “new normal.” 6. Provide Students with Choice and Autonomy. Provide students with choices so that they feel more invested. For example, you might let students choose which discussions to participate in, or you might give them options about how to participate, for example by sharing something they have created or by responding to a prompt with an essay. 7. Make sure Tasks are Relevant, Appropriate, and Worthy of Their Attention. Characteristics of a learning task can increase or decrease student caring. For example, consider the following questions: Is the task inherently interesting? Is it important to the students on a personal level? Can they make a connection between the task and their own lived experiences? Is there some novelty to it? Is the purpose clear? Is it important to them? Is it a creative activity? Is there enough time to successfully complete the task?
              Cross Academy Techniques to Promote Caring
              Consider the following techniques that promote caring and also provide students with ways to demonstrate caring about the topic or their learning: Three-Minute Message: 3-Minute Messages are modeled on the Three-Minute Thesis (3MT) academic competition, in which students have three minutes to present a compelling argument and to support it with convincing details and examples. View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
              Briefing Paper: In a Briefing Paper, students research a current problem of their choice, summarize the main issues, and present solutions to a specific audience. View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
              What? So What? Now What? Journals: In What? So What? Now What? Journals, students reflect on their recent course-related activities as they respond to each prompt in a journal entry. View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
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                " ["post_title"]=> string(68) "7 Steps to Help Students Care About Learning During a Time of Crisis" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(41) "helping-students-care-in-a-time-of-crisis" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2021-03-10 09:28:09" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2021-03-10 17:28:09" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(34) "https://kpcrossacademy.org/?p=3677" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [7]=> object(WP_Post)#7974 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(2179) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "5" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-07-08 01:39:18" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-07-08 01:39:18" ["post_content"]=> string(11234) "After years - even decades - of teaching onsite, many instructors are able to teach a traditional, classroom-based course without having laid out the entire course in advance. This approach doesn’t work well in the online classroom, however, as online course delivery requires more fully developing the course ahead of time. Thus, when teaching online, the process of course design is essential. Online course design requires a wide range of skills and tools and managing both the design and the technical aspects of the course. A Brief Overview of Online Course Design When engaging in course design, the concept of instructional alignment is useful to consider. Instructional alignment begins with the identification of learning goals. Those goals then direct other decisions, including how you will help students achieve these goals (materials and methods), what tools can best help you help students achieve them (technologies), and how you will know if the goals have been met (assessment). We illustrate the idea of instructional alignment in online courses in the following figure: In this model, one element leads to the next. For example, if you are teaching an English class, you might have a learning goal of critical thinking, with a specific objective that learners will critically evaluate a play. Your learning materials might include the specific play to be evaluated as well as an article or chapter describing a model of critical evaluation. For your learning activities, you might ask learners to read the materials and then practice critical evaluation through Active Reading Documents in which your questions lead students through a critical analysis that prepares them to then write a report on their own. For the technology, you might use a Learning Management System (LMS) and have the materials available within it as well as a downloadable template for the Active Reading Documents. For the assessment, students might write a formal report using the evaluation model to critically evaluate the play. All of these key elements in the instructional alignment model should be determined before an online course goes live. The following are tips related to instructional alignment during course design. 1. Develop Course and Module Learning Goals and Objectives Most of us are familiar with the idea of developing course goals and objectives; after all, we usually have to include course level goals and objectives in every syllabus we create. But not all of us are as familiar with developing goals for specific learning modules. When we teach online, developing, and then displaying more targeted micro-goals for specific modules helps make our learning expectations clear. 2. Use Multiple Media for Learning Materials Traditionally, many of us share content by asking students to read a chapter or article and then we elaborate by presenting additional content through lectures. We can accomplish these forms of sharing content in similar ways online. Many resources are available to present text versions of lectures, and we can also present either synchronous lectures through video conferencing or asynchronous pre-recorded video lectures online. In addition, there are a range of free resources available online, such as pre-recorded videos and free open educational resources (OERs). A mix of media (text, video, audio, graphics) is typically more effective than using only one type because the variety can help keep students more engaged. 3. Choose Appropriate Learning Tasks It is important to think through what students will do in your online course. Common instructional tasks in online courses include the following:
                • Connect—Activate students’ prior knowledge of the content so that learners can make better connections to new content through an activity such as a Background Knowledge Probe.
                • Learn/Watch/Read— Provide learners with the new content.
                • Practice—Implement activities that reinforce their new learning.
                • Share/Discuss—Enable students to find personal relevance and share their experiences with their peers, perhaps through a discussion thread. Consider for example using a Think-Pair-Share.
                • Assess—Ask students to demonstrate learning, whether through a quiz, assignment, project, or other.
                • Reflect— Challenge students to reflect on what they have learned.
                Aim for having the same kinds of activities due on the same days of the week. If for example, you do a discussion board each week, choose the day when students will post (for example have discussions due on Wednesday and responses due on Friday). If they have an assessment to complete each week, choose a different due day for that activity (for example, have the assessment due on Thursday), and so forth. 4. Humanize the Technology Technology can serve as a mediator between people. A few suggestions for accomplishing this are as follows:
                • Simplify the NavigationMany Learning Management Systems make choices for you, including what will be in the navigation bar. Think through how students will work their way through the course and what students really need to see in the navigation menu. Unnecessary items can result in overwhelmed students. Providing clarity and ensuring intuitive organization of materials can improve learner satisfaction as well as promoting deeper learning.
                • Strive for a Humanized Look and FeelThere is a tendency in online courses to use built-in icons and heavy text. Graphics, images, and short videos can create a warmer look and a more human-friendly feel to the course.
                • Ensure Accessibility—Effective online courses should be accessible to all learners. One way to do this is to make sure courses are “universally designed.” Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is built on the idea that all learning experiences should be purposefully constructed to be “barrier free” and accessible by providing multiple and flexible methods of the following elements:
                  • Presentation of content (e.g., voice-to-text applications, screen readers, digital books).
                  • Alternatives for students to demonstrate what they have learned (e.g., concept mapping).
                  • Engagement to tap into diverse learners’ interests, challenge them appropriately, and motivate them to learn (choices among various scenarios for learning the same competency).
                5. Include Multiple Learning Assessments While one assessment alone can generate evidence to make decisions about student learning and development, multiple measures encourage more comprehensive and accurate assessment. This benefits not only the students who are learning but also the instructors who are doing the teaching. Consider the following learning artifacts commonly used to assess student learning in online courses.
                • Discussion Posts
                • Groupwork Products
                • Quizzes
                • Exams
                • Written or Video Assignments
                • Digital Projects or Portfolios
                Consider providing students with choices for assignments, such as what to write about for the assignment or how to respond to a discussion post or even which assignments they will complete. In conclusion, online course design requires concerted time and attention. To summarize some of the key points we have described, we have further developed our instructional alignment figure for online courses as follows: Try incorporating these teaching techniques into your online course design.

                Background Knowledge Probe

                View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:

                Think Pair Share

                View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:

                Active Reading Documents

                View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
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                  " ["post_title"]=> string(40) "5 Tips for Engaging Online Course Design" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(29) "engaging-online-course-design" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-07-10 00:53:56" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-07-10 00:53:56" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(34) "https://kpcrossacademy.org/?p=2179" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [8]=> object(WP_Post)#7930 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(816) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "4" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-05-09 19:26:20" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-05-09 19:26:20" ["post_content"]=> string(1570) "“Learning is not attained by chance, it must be sought for with ardor and attended to with diligence.” ~ Abigal Adams One of the most often cited works on learning, and one we refer to often, is John Bransford, Ann Brown, and Rodney Cocking’s 2000 work appropriately titled How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School. The report, which was commissioned by the National Research Council, presents research in cognitive science and connects the findings to implications for teaching and learning. You can find the full report, all 374 pages of it, here: https://www.nap.edu/read/9853/chapter/1 Helpfully, the staff at the Center for Teaching at Vanderbilt University have developed a teaching guide with highlights from the report. For their summary, see the following link: https://cft.vanderbilt.edu//cft/guides-sub-pages/how-people-learn/ The CFT staff hone in on the nature of expertise and the challenges students face as they seek to develop expertise. The staff suggest that teachers should seek to gauge student levels of knowledge and that we should also make our thinking visible to students so that we are modeling our expertise. We hope that you find these resources helpful. As always, if you know of an interesting resource that we should feature, please drop us a line at info@kpcrossacademy.org; we will of course credit you for the information you share.  " ["post_title"]=> string(14) "How They Learn" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(14) "how-they-learn" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 17:38:41" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 17:38:41" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(32) "http://kpcrossacademy.org/?p=816" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [9]=> object(WP_Post)#7648 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(1575) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "4" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 02:42:22" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 02:42:22" ["post_content"]=> string(9211) "The COVID-19 pandemic has led to many if not most college faculty teaching in virtual classrooms. While many of us are turning to synchronous lectures with video conferencing tools such as Zoom or Blackboard Collaborate, many of us are also choosing to create asynchronous video lectures that students can watch anytime, anywhere. There are many valid reasons for making this teach-from-home choice; among them are some students may have difficulty accessing synchronous class activities—they may be living in a different time zone, have limited internet access, among other reasons. The benefits of an asynchronous e-classroom setup, beyond time and place flexibility, include the fact that students can scan, search, and re-watch lectures. Moreover, as faculty, you have the luxury of time to think fully through what you are going to say ahead of time and afterward, to edit the videos so that you produce the best e-lecture product possible. A few effective ways to use asynchronous videos are:
                  • A welcome video
                  • An introduction to a topic or module
                  • A demonstration
                  • A description of a difficult concept
                  • A synthesis of material from the learning module or unit
                  A few choices that you have for creating videos at home on your phone or laptop are as follows:
                  • Narrated slide presentation. In this video format, slides are the only thing visible in the video. The teacher does a voiceover to accompany the slides. These are useful for presenting complicated material for which visuals will likely enhance students’ understanding. PowerPoint has a built-in feature for recording over slides, but it can be clunky to have to click play between each slide. A better option is to export to YouTube or Vimeo or use a screencast program such as Screencastomatic or Screencastify that you can also share to YouTube or Vimeo.
                  • Presenter-only lecture. In this kind of lecture, the instructor appears without other visual supports. This approach can make the instructor appear as a mere talking head if overdone. But they can be useful in short segments to add teacher presence to the course and help students feel like you are “there.” These can be done in a fairly low-tech way, such as through a smartphone video, Zoom, or Blackboard Collaborate recording done ahead of time.
                  • Slide presentation with presenter view. This approach is a combination of presenter and slide presentation, which allows you to capitalize on the benefits of both approaches. Programs such as Panopto and Tegrity provide a professional look, but you can also record in Zoom or other video conferencing programs ahead of time.
                  To create the most engaging asynchronous video presentations possible, be sure that you attend to the following issues:
                  1. Lighting: Make sure that you have ample lighting and that the light hits your face rather than coming from behind you.
                  2. Storyboards: If you are doing the lecture for the first time, consider creating a storyboard, which is simply a plan of what you will say, show, and describe. A good storyboard can provide you with a roadmap. Feel free to download and use our template.
                  3. Scripts: Develop a script of what you will say to ensure that you address the most important content. You can then use the script as the transcript of the video for accessibility purposes. If you would like to be more impromptu in your approach but need to create a transcript, consider using a program like Zoom that will allow you to record and change the settings to prepare a transcript, which you can then edit.
                  4. Slide Design. See our blog post on creating engaging synchronous lectures for tips on effective slide design for video lectures.
                  5. Copyright: Because your video will be tangible and long lasting, you need to ensure that you have permission to use all images, video, music, or other content that is not your own. You can find many free images and music through sources such as Creative Commons, Unsplash, or Pixabay. Just be sure to give credit where credit is due.
                  6. Shelf-Life: You may well want to use the video you create in the future, and you will be better able to do so if you are attentive to the shelf life of your content. While it may be virtually impossible not to mention the Coronavirus pandemic, consider limiting such references so that you are able to edit the information out later.
                  7. Learning Chunks: It is exceedingly difficult to watch long lectures, particularly on video. Try to break your lectures into no more than 10-minute chunks per video. If you simply cannot do this, consider asking students to stop the video to complete a task every 10 minutes.
                  8. Active Learning: While the video will be asynchronous, you can and should still expect students to learn actively while they are watching. Consider implementing the following techniques in your online class to break up your asynchronous video lecture and keep your students active and engaged:
                  • Guided Notes | View Technique →
                  • Quick WriteView Technique →
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                  Be explicit about application
                  When engaging students in activities that promote the application of knowledge to new contexts, instructors should feel free to make their learning goals and expectations clear. Students will practice application better when they learn to recognize it. They will likely more willingly engage if the instructor explains the benefits of application for future learning and even career aspirations.
                  Focus on core concepts
                  Students can more effectively apply knowledge when they comprehend the core principles behind the content and skills that they need to use. You can develop activities to help students develop a deeper understanding of relationships, shared functions, or similar organizing principles prior to asking students to apply the material in new contexts.
                  Identify sub skills
                  Asking students to apply what they have learned can sound like a fairly easy task to accomplish, but in reality, it is complicated, and students may not have developed the skills they need to do it well. They need skills in differentiating, classifying, categorizing, organizing, and making attributions. They also need problem solving. It can be useful to scaffold application to highlight the subtasks until students become more comfortable with and clear on their roles and responsibilities.
                  Provide students with practice
                  Students develop the ability to apply their learning by practicing application. Instructors can present two different scenarios, formulas, or readings and ask students to find single approaches for solving or analyzing each. Alternately, they can ask students to construct a different problem or scenario that requires the same skills and knowledge as a pre-completed assignment.
                  Make it social and collaborative
                  Application of knowledge can be particularly effective when it is done in a cooperative social context that allows peers to develop explanations, provide each other with feedback, and share responsibility for learning. 
                  Involve students in the process
                  Students will be more invested in applying what they have learned if they are called upon to mindfully and explicitly search for ways to make connections, to classify, to sort, and so on. Likewise, they will be more invested if called upon to self monitor their progress and success in applying information in new ways. Self-reflection and self-assessment are great tools for accomplishing this goal. For information about active learning techniques that prompt students to apply knowledge, see our videos for the following techniques:  " ["post_title"]=> string(65) "Getting Students to Apply What They Have Learned in a New Context" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(65) "getting-students-to-apply-what-they-have-learned-in-a-new-context" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 17:37:38" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 17:37:38" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(33) "http://kpcrossacademy.org/?p=1221" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } ["comment_count"]=> int(0) ["current_comment"]=> int(-1) ["found_posts"]=> int(35) ["max_num_pages"]=> float(4) ["max_num_comment_pages"]=> int(0) ["is_single"]=> bool(false) ["is_preview"]=> bool(false) ["is_page"]=> bool(false) ["is_archive"]=> bool(false) ["is_date"]=> bool(false) ["is_year"]=> bool(false) ["is_month"]=> bool(false) ["is_day"]=> bool(false) ["is_time"]=> bool(false) ["is_author"]=> bool(false) ["is_category"]=> bool(false) ["is_tag"]=> bool(false) ["is_tax"]=> bool(false) ["is_search"]=> bool(false) ["is_feed"]=> bool(false) ["is_comment_feed"]=> bool(false) ["is_trackback"]=> bool(false) ["is_home"]=> bool(true) ["is_privacy_policy"]=> bool(false) ["is_404"]=> bool(false) ["is_embed"]=> bool(false) ["is_paged"]=> bool(false) ["is_admin"]=> bool(false) ["is_attachment"]=> bool(false) ["is_singular"]=> bool(false) ["is_robots"]=> bool(false) ["is_favicon"]=> bool(false) ["is_posts_page"]=> bool(false) ["is_post_type_archive"]=> bool(false) ["query_vars_hash":"WP_Query":private]=> string(32) "624526c0adb57e738deaffa631df580d" ["query_vars_changed":"WP_Query":private]=> bool(false) ["thumbnails_cached"]=> bool(false) ["stopwords":"WP_Query":private]=> NULL ["compat_fields":"WP_Query":private]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(15) "query_vars_hash" [1]=> string(18) "query_vars_changed" } ["compat_methods":"WP_Query":private]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(16) "init_query_flags" [1]=> string(15) "parse_tax_query" } }
                  3 Tips For Making the Most of Cross Academy Online Teaching Resources
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                        string(3855) "“Students don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care.” ~Anonymous
                  
                  Most of us chose careers in academia because we care deeply about our disciplines or fields. It can be discouraging, therefore, to face students whose indifference to our courses is palpable. Yet caring is an essential element of their learning. As Fink suggests, “When students care about something, they then have the energy they need for learning more about it and making it a part of their lives. Without the energy for learning, nothing significant happens.” Certainly, common sense and our own experience as teachers suggest that students who really care about what they are learning to invest the time and effort to learn it well and remember it longer.
                  
                  There is no easy way to get students to care. We offer some suggestions for your consideration:
                  
                  Be a Role Model For Caring
                  Students tend to respond to the level of energy and enthusiasm that you generate in kind. If you demonstrate that you are passionate about your subject and about teaching, as well as their learning, your students are more likely to connect with you and with the content and to strive to do their best.
                  Care About the Students
                  Most students will be motivated if they believe you care about them. Indeed, caring about the students as individuals is critical to their success as well as to their satisfaction with the course and with your teaching. Getting to know them is helpful on this front, as you can then target instruction to student background and interests.
                  Set High Expectations
                  Research is fairly clear that students appreciate it when a teacher has high expectations for them and hold them to it. In short, when they are expected to learn more and perform better, they often do. Students often perform in ways that their teachers expect.
                  Give Students Ownership in the Content and Process
                  If students have some flexibility in what they study and how they study it, they are more likely to care about both aspects. For example, if they choose paper and project topics that most interest them, and if they have some decision about the assessment (tests, papers, projects, posters, presentations), they have more control over how they develop understanding and how they demonstrate it to you. Control often leads to caring in this circumstance.
                  Encourage Students to Connect Content to Their Lives/the Outside World
                  Oftentimes to students, our courses can seem completely disconnected from their lived experiences. We can find ways to make connections more transparent. When they have the opportunity to see that content is important and relevant to them, they tend to care more.
                  Choose Assignments That are at the Appropriate Target Level
                  Students need to have assignments that are challenging enough to be interesting but not so difficult that they feel dazed, confused, and helpless. You can design assignments that are appropriately challenging in view of the experience and aptitude of the class.
                  Place Appropriate Emphasis on Testing and Grading
                  Graded items can create incentives or disincentives. You can strive for assessments that show students what they have mastered, rather than what they have not. College teachers can help promote students caring. For information about active learning techniques that promote caring, see our videos for the following techniques: " ["post_title"]=> string(45) "Getting Students to Care About Their Learning" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(45) "getting-students-to-care-about-their-learning" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 17:37:27" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 17:37:27" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(33) "http://kpcrossacademy.org/?p=1286" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [1]=> object(WP_Post)#8003 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(1221) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-12-09 00:42:35" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-12-09 00:42:35" ["post_content"]=> string(4189) "“Knowledge without application is like a book that is never read” ~Christopher Crawford As college teachers, we want students to think deeply about course content and skills, yet sometimes it feels like students never progress beyond surface-level understanding. One of the best ways to help students get to deeper learning is to have them use what they have learned in a new way. In his taxonomy of Significant Learning, Fink (2013) suggests that application means learning how to do some new kind of action. In his taxonomy, Bloom suggests that application means students take what they’ve learned and apply it to a different scenario, often one outside of the classroom. For example, students could use a math formula they’ve learned to calculate a family budget or apply a legal ruling to a specific case in news headlines. To make sure that students show they can apply what they learn, consider the following suggestions:
                  Be explicit about application
                  When engaging students in activities that promote the application of knowledge to new contexts, instructors should feel free to make their learning goals and expectations clear. Students will practice application better when they learn to recognize it. They will likely more willingly engage if the instructor explains the benefits of application for future learning and even career aspirations.
                  Focus on core concepts
                  Students can more effectively apply knowledge when they comprehend the core principles behind the content and skills that they need to use. You can develop activities to help students develop a deeper understanding of relationships, shared functions, or similar organizing principles prior to asking students to apply the material in new contexts.
                  Identify sub skills
                  Asking students to apply what they have learned can sound like a fairly easy task to accomplish, but in reality, it is complicated, and students may not have developed the skills they need to do it well. They need skills in differentiating, classifying, categorizing, organizing, and making attributions. They also need problem solving. It can be useful to scaffold application to highlight the subtasks until students become more comfortable with and clear on their roles and responsibilities.
                  Provide students with practice
                  Students develop the ability to apply their learning by practicing application. Instructors can present two different scenarios, formulas, or readings and ask students to find single approaches for solving or analyzing each. Alternately, they can ask students to construct a different problem or scenario that requires the same skills and knowledge as a pre-completed assignment.
                  Make it social and collaborative
                  Application of knowledge can be particularly effective when it is done in a cooperative social context that allows peers to develop explanations, provide each other with feedback, and share responsibility for learning. 
                  Involve students in the process
                  Students will be more invested in applying what they have learned if they are called upon to mindfully and explicitly search for ways to make connections, to classify, to sort, and so on. Likewise, they will be more invested if called upon to self monitor their progress and success in applying information in new ways. Self-reflection and self-assessment are great tools for accomplishing this goal. For information about active learning techniques that prompt students to apply knowledge, see our videos for the following techniques:  " ["post_title"]=> string(65) "Getting Students to Apply What They Have Learned in a New Context" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(65) "getting-students-to-apply-what-they-have-learned-in-a-new-context" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 17:37:38" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 17:37:38" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(33) "http://kpcrossacademy.org/?p=1221" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [2]=> object(WP_Post)#8005 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(6415) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "5" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2021-10-12 07:00:17" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2021-10-12 14:00:17" ["post_content"]=> string(4436) "
                  It’s been said that the best tool is the one you actually have with you, but how useful that tool is really comes down to whether or not you know best how to use it. Bearing that in mind, this post is aimed at helping you best utilize the online teaching resources provided by the K. Patricia Cross Academy.
                  Video Sort Features
                  With a library of 50 technique videos covering a wide range of subject matter, seeking out a specific video never requires more than a few clicks when using the library’s advanced sorting features.  Even better, the filters are applied in real-time for a smoother browsing experience! Teaching Environment The broadest filter, ‘Teaching Environment’ allows you to select videos based on the intended teaching environment—in-person or online—and is a great way to lend a bit of direction to your general library browsing. Activity Type Do you already have a particular activity type in mind? If you’re looking to approach a certain lesson element in a different way, the ‘Activity Type’ filter allows for efficient browsing and discovery of videos covering activity-specific techniques as well as the resources needed to implement them into your lessons. Teaching Problem Addressed Looking for a way to target a specific issue you’re facing in the classroom? The ‘Teaching Problem Addressed’ filter allows you to find videos directly related to the various teaching challenges you face. Learning Taxonomic Dimension Great for organizing videos based on how they address individual elements of the broader learning process, the ‘Learning Taxonomic Dimension’ filter categorizes the entire video library according to which broader piece of the learning puzzle they address. 
                  Online Teaching Technique Videos
                  As the pandemic has dramatically accelerated the adoption of—and reliance on—online learning environments, tailoring teaching techniques to best utilize (and accommodate) the medium has become an essential skill for ensuring teaching and learning do not suffer outside of traditional learning environments. In order to help aid the transition, 38 online teaching technique videos (and counting) have been adapted to offer resources and instruction tailored specifically to the unique considerations presented by teaching and learning in an online environment. 
                  Subscribe to Our Newsletter
                  From topical insights on the issues facing today’s educators to more detailed discussions of some of the finer points of various teaching techniques, our monthly newsletter has been designed to deliver a wealth of tips, strategies, and knowledge directly to your inbox for FREE!

                    We're Here For You—And The Future of Higher Education
                    The K. Patricia Cross Academy is dedicated to supporting faculty in their effort to develop effective, high-impact teaching techniques that improve students' learning through an evidence-based approach.
                    Our instructional videos and downloadable resources have been designed to help both faculty and students, and they also represent our continued investment in the future of higher education. We hope these resources will help you in your efforts to teach both effectively and efficiently.
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                    Higher education institutions have been scrambling to meet the demand for remote and online courses. This has been due in part to general growth trends in online enrollment, but it has also been accelerated out of response to the Covid-19 pandemic. Because of this, we have focused on helping faculty teach more effectively online.

                    In this blog, we turn our attention to the learning experiences these courses provide students. Understanding students' experiences in online courses has implications on the effectiveness of teaching strategies. A look at published research shows several factors related to the quality of student experiences that faculty can address when developing their online courses.

                    Research on Student Experiences Online

                    Instructor Availability and Accessibility

                    Instructor accessibility is an important theme that emerges in research on student experiences of online learning. Students who have positive experiences tend to describe instructors as “being there,” “being quick to respond,” “responding within 24 hours,” and “bending over backwards to help.” They also share that instructors who are readily available are helpful to their learning and that they appreciate that these instructors are accessible for answering questions. Students describe these instructors as being clear and as communicating frequently.

                    Unfortunately, not all students have positive experiences with their online instructors. Students say their learning suffers when their professors are absent. Students with negative experiences in online learning describe their instructors as, “quite invisible” and “you didn’t see them.” Instructor absence makes students feel that the professors are “not interested in us,” and thus the students are less likely to approach them for help or to ask any questions. This leaves students feeling that their instructor does not think that they or their learning is important.

                    Instructors should consider how to make themselves present and available when teaching online.  There are many ways to be there for students in online courses. For example, you can include a welcome, add your bio, contribute to discussions, and give timely feedback on student work.

                    Student Time Management

                    One of the most valuable skills online students can have is effective time management. The better that students manage their learning time, the easier it is for them to achieve their learning goals. Without the camaraderie of a class to motivate them or having a set time where they need to be on campus, effective time management is crucial to staying focused. Those who have good skills in this area tend to feel prepared for online learning and tend to feel that they can manage and learn online.

                    Some students express concern about their abilities to manage their time in online courses, however. When they come into online learning without effective time management skills, they may not remember to log in. They may not work sufficiently in advance to meet deadlines. Indeed, they may forget deadlines altogether. Obviously, lacking these essential skills can have a negative effect on their learning. Having an instructor who can help them, however, can mitigate the lack of skills.

                    Instructors should think through how to help students better time manage and how to help them develop the skills to do so. Consider using Lecture Engagement Logs. These are records that guide students in documenting the work they should be doing before, during, and after a lecture, but they can easily be adapted to scaffold work in conjunction with other course activities.

                    Lecture Engagement Logs View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:

                    Collaborative Learning

                    Many students who are learning online want opportunities to connect with peers, and for good reason. One of the challenges students most often describe attending their learning online is the feeling of “isolation.” One student described such feelings as follows:

                    I feel isolated; I do not know my fellow learners well and I do not have the courage to phone them, to see if they feel the same distress as me, the same fears. I do not even dare to phone my instructor…The nature of distance learning makes me see everything from a distance.

                    Another student in an online course said this, “I haven’t talked with much of anybody this semester” and another said they “didn’t feel connected.” Another put it this way: “I have felt it . . . panic. . . isolation . . . frustration . . . anger.” Instances of isolation are often related to lack of communication or connection in the online classroom. Clearly these feelings can have a negative effect on student learning.

                    Students themselves appear to recognize that the social connection is critical to their learning. One student explained it this way:

                    It was pretty important to know that there were people out there who were feeling the same thing … It was a little bit scary. I was thinking can I do it; can’t I do it? … This might sound a little bit perverse, but it was reassuring to know that other people were feeling the same thing; that it was quite normal.

                    Students recognize that not only is the connection with the instructor important then, but it is also important that they establish and maintain connection with each other.

                    So, what is to be done? Collaborative learning involves two or more people working in a group to learn something together. Students who participate in collaborative learning capitalize on one another's knowledge and skills. Usually, students working collaboratively search for understanding or meaning, solutions to problems, or they create a product. Collaborative learning tasks vary widely, but most often, they center on students’ exploration or application of the course material. Collaborative learning, at least on low stakes activities, can be critical in an online course. Consider for example trying a Jigsaw in your online course. In Jigsaw, students work in small groups to develop knowledge about a given topic before teaching what they have learned to another group.

                    Jigsaw View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
                    Conclusion

                    In conclusion, students take online courses for a number of reasons, and in the middle of a global pandemic, one of those reasons is that they simply have to in order to continue their education. Several factors influence their experience, some of which faculty have direct influence over. Instructors should work to establish presence in the absence of physical co-presence, work to help students manage their time and efforts in learning, and strive to create a sense of community.

                    Reference:

                    Blackmon, S. J. & Major, C. H. (2012). Student experiences in online courses: A qualitative research synthesis. Quarterly Review of Distance Education, 13(2), 77-85.

                    " ["post_title"]=> string(61) "What Do We Know About Student Experiences of Online Learning?" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(60) "what-do-we-know-about-student-experiences-of-online-learning" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2022-01-07 15:05:27" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2022-01-07 23:05:27" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(34) "https://kpcrossacademy.org/?p=2588" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [4]=> object(WP_Post)#7996 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(2688) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "5" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-11-10 07:02:20" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-11-10 07:02:20" ["post_content"]=> string(9647) "Active learning has come of age in higher education, with many educators adopting this method of teaching in their courses and with many studies documenting its effectiveness as an instructional approach. But what is active learning anyway? And given the fact that so many of us are teaching online, what does it look like in an online course? Descriptions of active learning in general are broad and imprecise. Several commonly cited definitions of active learning are as follows:
                    • Anything that involves students in doing things and thinking about the things they are doing (Bonwell & Eison, 1991).
                    • A process whereby students engage in activities, such as reading, writing, discussion, or problem solving that promote analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of class content (University of Michigan, Center for Research on Teaching and Learning, 2016)
                    • A process of learning through activities and/or discussion in class, as opposed to passively listening to an expert. It emphasizes higher-order thinking and often involves group work (Freeman, et al., 2014).
                    We have argued for a broader understanding of active learning than simply associating the term with an instructional approach, activity, or technique in several books in the College Teaching Techniques series. In so doing, we suggested that active learning involves making students dynamic participants in their own learning in ways that require them to integrate new information into their personal knowledge and experience. We suspect that what promotes active learning is different for different learners, but in general, we suggest that students are active learners when they are engaged in their learning in one or more of the following ways.

                    Students are active learners when they:

                    • Use sophisticated learning strategies
                    • Seek deep, conceptual understanding rather than surface knowledge
                    • Use learning strategies with personal relevance
                    • Use self-regulatory and metacognitive strategies
                    • Seek to share personal perspectives
                    • Seek to understand others’ perspectives
                    • Demonstrate curiosity, interest, and enthusiasm
                    • Offer input or suggestions
                    •  Seek out additional and further opportunities for learning
                    Although active learning can happen anywhere and at any time, we propose that when identifying an approach to promote active learning in a college course, teachers should consider two components: a learning task and a goal for the level of activity involved. By learning task, we mean an academic activity that an instructor has intentionally designed for students to do to help them meet important learning outcomes. We believe that the task can include listening to a lecture; after all, there is a body of work on active listening. The challenge is to make sure that students are using those higher-level listening skills, rather than just hearing the facts. That brings us to our second construct, level of activity, by which we mean students’ mental investment and the strategies they use to reflect on and monitor the processes and the results of their learning. Level of activity is a discrete component because one type of learning task does not necessarily demand more mental investment than another; rather, each type of learning task can require more or less mental activity depending on the individual learner as well as the content and design of the specific task. For example, although some educators argue that students who are listening to a lecture are necessarily learning more passively than those who are solving problems, consider the following problem: X + 3 = 5. Most college students can solve this problem without too much mental activity.
                    However, college students who are listening carefully to a highly engaging lecture can have high levels of mental activity, including focused attention, curiosity, empathy, critical thinking, and so forth. Thus, students can have low to high levels of mental activity in any given learning task and any given learning task can require and result in more or less active learning from students.
                    We offer our own conception of the active learning continuum for several key learning tasks in the following Table:   Viewed in this way, the term active learning can and should include the learning that can occur when students are listening to a lecture. If students learn something during a lecture, they have been mentally active, whether through listening, remembering, questioning, contemplating, or other. They likely have also been involved in activities such as note-taking, and in our model of interactive lectures, they will participate in additional activities, such as discussing and problem-solving. The challenge, then, is to help students move from level 1 (low) to level 3 (high) on the continuum in terms of their mental activity, whatever the learning task happens to be. So what does this look like online? We suggest that the mechanism itself is much the same as it is onsite. Faculty should choose the task, select a technique that helps students achieve the learning goal with a high level of mental activity (which you can do by sorting our videos by activity type.) To get started, consider the following active learning techniques:
                    Active Reading Documents
                    Carefully prepared forms that guide students through the process of critical and careful reading. View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
                    Online Resource Scavenger Hunt
                    Students use the internet to engage in fact-finding and information processing exercises using instructor-specified library and Internet sources. View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
                    Quick Write
                    Quick Write is a learning assessment technique where learners respond to an open-ended prompt. View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
                    Case Studies
                    In Case Studies student teams review a real-life problem scenario in depth. Team members apply course concepts to identify and evaluate alternative approaches to solving the problem. View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
                    Thus, we encourage faculty who are new to teaching online to put pedagogy first and to be very intentional in their efforts to promote active learning. That is, consider what the learning goal is, what the learning task is, and what technique you can use to accomplish it. After you make these determinations, next you can consider what tool can facilitate your teaching and promote active learning most effectively. To sign up for our newsletter, where you will receive information about new blog posts, click here:

                      Reference Barkley, E. F., & Major, C. H. (2018). Interactive lecturing: A handbook for college faculty. San Francisco: Jossey Bass/Wiley." ["post_title"]=> string(48) "4 Techniques to Encourage Active Learning Online" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(22) "active-learning-online" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-12-01 00:11:03" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-12-01 00:11:03" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(34) "https://kpcrossacademy.org/?p=2688" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [5]=> object(WP_Post)#7997 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(472) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2018-11-26 21:34:26" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2018-11-26 21:34:26" ["post_content"]=> string(1524) "Creating or revising a syllabus can be fun. You get to think through what students should learn in the course, what content they will review, what skills they will practice, and what assignments they will complete during the term. One of the most tedious aspects of creating or revising a syllabus, though, is figuring out and filling in the dates each semester, particularly if you have a class that meets, or in the case of online courses has assignments due, multiple times a week. Cue the generic syllabus date finder, created by Caleb McDaniel and hosted on the Rice University Web site at the following URL: http://wcaleb.rice.edu/syllabusmaker/generic/ This simple tool will prompt you to enter the year of your course, the start and end date, and the days on which you will meet (or have work due from students). Once you fill in the relevant information, hitting “submit” will result in a list of dates for the term and will save you the time of having to find them on a calendar. We hope you find this tool useful! As always, if you know of an interesting resource that we should feature, please drop us a line at info@kpcrossacademy.org; we will of course credit you for the information you share." ["post_title"]=> string(31) "It's Not Always in the Syllabus" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(30) "its-not-always-in-the-syllabus" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 17:59:33" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 17:59:33" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(32) "https://kpci.wpengine.com/?p=472" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [6]=> object(WP_Post)#7999 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(3677) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2021-03-10 07:00:03" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2021-03-10 15:00:03" ["post_content"]=> string(8959) "The COVID-19 pandemic and its surrounding political climate find us all in a time of crisis. Teachers and students alike are often caring for family members, friends, and themselves. That students are doing so while continuing their studies demonstrates that they do care, and they likely care deeply, for the people in their lives. But with the distractions brought about during this time of crisis, it can be a challenge for them to focus their care additionally on their studies. As educators, we know there is a strong relationship between caring about learning and quality of learning. As Fink argues, “When students care about something, they then have the energy they need for learning more about it and making it a part of their lives. Without the energy for learning, nothing significant happens” (2013, p. 360). It seems simple common sense that students who really care about what they are learning will invest the time and effort required to learn it well and remember it longer. So how do we help students focus their care on learning, during a crisis, during an age of significant distraction?
                      What Does Caring Mean During a Crisis?
                      When we care about something, we have acquired an affective disposition toward it that combines concern and perhaps even affection: we value it, appreciate it, and anticipate opportunities to encounter it.  “Caring” in education refers to the degree to which students are interested in, or have feelings about, various aspects of their learning, and it can apply to an array of foci that include topic-specific phenomena and ideas, human beings, and the process of learning itself. It means the focusing of consciousness and the narrowing of attention on learning We often know when students care about their learning. If students care about a course, they will show up for it and will invest appropriate time and energy into the learning activities.  If students care about their peers, they will listen actively when others speak and demonstrate compassion and empathy as they develop deeper understanding of another’s perspectives or experiences. If students care about the topic, they will ask pertinent questions and be sufficiently curious to go beyond the minimum class requirements. How does all this work when they simply don’t have the physical stamina, time, cognitive bandwidth, or emotional energy for the learning?
                      How Do We Get Students to Care about Learning during a Crisis?
                      Following are suggestions for promoting caring in college and university courses during a crisis: 1. Acknowledge the Crisis and How You are Addressing It. It will help students to care if they know that you care, too, and that you understand where they are coming from. Tell them how you have adapted the course or activities and explain how you hope they will adapt in turn. 2. Humanize the Course. Particularly if you are teaching online, make sure that you have a warm and inviting space for students. You also need to be there and show your personality. Helping students to make connections with you and with each other builds community in the class and can help students to care more about their own work. Being there and forming that community is likely the most essential element of caring in a time of crisis. 3. Reconsider Rigor. Rigor is important, but be sure that you aren’t focusing excessively on it. It’s important to balance rigor with being supportive of students and their learning during this time. Think through how you can provide a quality learning experience during these unique circumstances. Students are more likely to care if they believe that you aren’t out to prove how tough you and the course are, but instead are doing your best to ensure they learn. 4. Make it Manageable. Provide a clear structure and a clear schedule. Give students challenges that increase in difficulty incrementally. One reason that students fail to care is that they believe that they can't or won’t be successful. One way to negate that is to give them small challenges so they can be successful in completing them and then build difficulty and complexity over time. 5. Stay Positive. There are many things to be negative about right now, but your course, content, and student learning aren’t part of that. You can help ensure that students care by staying positive about the learning. Consider using positive language, for example, talking about what they will gain from the course and how they will use it in the future or when we return to the “new normal.” 6. Provide Students with Choice and Autonomy. Provide students with choices so that they feel more invested. For example, you might let students choose which discussions to participate in, or you might give them options about how to participate, for example by sharing something they have created or by responding to a prompt with an essay. 7. Make sure Tasks are Relevant, Appropriate, and Worthy of Their Attention. Characteristics of a learning task can increase or decrease student caring. For example, consider the following questions: Is the task inherently interesting? Is it important to the students on a personal level? Can they make a connection between the task and their own lived experiences? Is there some novelty to it? Is the purpose clear? Is it important to them? Is it a creative activity? Is there enough time to successfully complete the task?
                      Cross Academy Techniques to Promote Caring
                      Consider the following techniques that promote caring and also provide students with ways to demonstrate caring about the topic or their learning: Three-Minute Message: 3-Minute Messages are modeled on the Three-Minute Thesis (3MT) academic competition, in which students have three minutes to present a compelling argument and to support it with convincing details and examples. View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
                      Briefing Paper: In a Briefing Paper, students research a current problem of their choice, summarize the main issues, and present solutions to a specific audience. View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
                      What? So What? Now What? Journals: In What? So What? Now What? Journals, students reflect on their recent course-related activities as they respond to each prompt in a journal entry. View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
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                        " ["post_title"]=> string(68) "7 Steps to Help Students Care About Learning During a Time of Crisis" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(41) "helping-students-care-in-a-time-of-crisis" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2021-03-10 09:28:09" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2021-03-10 17:28:09" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(34) "https://kpcrossacademy.org/?p=3677" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [7]=> object(WP_Post)#7974 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(2179) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "5" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-07-08 01:39:18" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-07-08 01:39:18" ["post_content"]=> string(11234) "After years - even decades - of teaching onsite, many instructors are able to teach a traditional, classroom-based course without having laid out the entire course in advance. This approach doesn’t work well in the online classroom, however, as online course delivery requires more fully developing the course ahead of time. Thus, when teaching online, the process of course design is essential. Online course design requires a wide range of skills and tools and managing both the design and the technical aspects of the course. A Brief Overview of Online Course Design When engaging in course design, the concept of instructional alignment is useful to consider. Instructional alignment begins with the identification of learning goals. Those goals then direct other decisions, including how you will help students achieve these goals (materials and methods), what tools can best help you help students achieve them (technologies), and how you will know if the goals have been met (assessment). We illustrate the idea of instructional alignment in online courses in the following figure: In this model, one element leads to the next. For example, if you are teaching an English class, you might have a learning goal of critical thinking, with a specific objective that learners will critically evaluate a play. Your learning materials might include the specific play to be evaluated as well as an article or chapter describing a model of critical evaluation. For your learning activities, you might ask learners to read the materials and then practice critical evaluation through Active Reading Documents in which your questions lead students through a critical analysis that prepares them to then write a report on their own. For the technology, you might use a Learning Management System (LMS) and have the materials available within it as well as a downloadable template for the Active Reading Documents. For the assessment, students might write a formal report using the evaluation model to critically evaluate the play. All of these key elements in the instructional alignment model should be determined before an online course goes live. The following are tips related to instructional alignment during course design. 1. Develop Course and Module Learning Goals and Objectives Most of us are familiar with the idea of developing course goals and objectives; after all, we usually have to include course level goals and objectives in every syllabus we create. But not all of us are as familiar with developing goals for specific learning modules. When we teach online, developing, and then displaying more targeted micro-goals for specific modules helps make our learning expectations clear. 2. Use Multiple Media for Learning Materials Traditionally, many of us share content by asking students to read a chapter or article and then we elaborate by presenting additional content through lectures. We can accomplish these forms of sharing content in similar ways online. Many resources are available to present text versions of lectures, and we can also present either synchronous lectures through video conferencing or asynchronous pre-recorded video lectures online. In addition, there are a range of free resources available online, such as pre-recorded videos and free open educational resources (OERs). A mix of media (text, video, audio, graphics) is typically more effective than using only one type because the variety can help keep students more engaged. 3. Choose Appropriate Learning Tasks It is important to think through what students will do in your online course. Common instructional tasks in online courses include the following:
                        • Connect—Activate students’ prior knowledge of the content so that learners can make better connections to new content through an activity such as a Background Knowledge Probe.
                        • Learn/Watch/Read— Provide learners with the new content.
                        • Practice—Implement activities that reinforce their new learning.
                        • Share/Discuss—Enable students to find personal relevance and share their experiences with their peers, perhaps through a discussion thread. Consider for example using a Think-Pair-Share.
                        • Assess—Ask students to demonstrate learning, whether through a quiz, assignment, project, or other.
                        • Reflect— Challenge students to reflect on what they have learned.
                        Aim for having the same kinds of activities due on the same days of the week. If for example, you do a discussion board each week, choose the day when students will post (for example have discussions due on Wednesday and responses due on Friday). If they have an assessment to complete each week, choose a different due day for that activity (for example, have the assessment due on Thursday), and so forth. 4. Humanize the Technology Technology can serve as a mediator between people. A few suggestions for accomplishing this are as follows:
                        • Simplify the NavigationMany Learning Management Systems make choices for you, including what will be in the navigation bar. Think through how students will work their way through the course and what students really need to see in the navigation menu. Unnecessary items can result in overwhelmed students. Providing clarity and ensuring intuitive organization of materials can improve learner satisfaction as well as promoting deeper learning.
                        • Strive for a Humanized Look and FeelThere is a tendency in online courses to use built-in icons and heavy text. Graphics, images, and short videos can create a warmer look and a more human-friendly feel to the course.
                        • Ensure Accessibility—Effective online courses should be accessible to all learners. One way to do this is to make sure courses are “universally designed.” Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is built on the idea that all learning experiences should be purposefully constructed to be “barrier free” and accessible by providing multiple and flexible methods of the following elements:
                          • Presentation of content (e.g., voice-to-text applications, screen readers, digital books).
                          • Alternatives for students to demonstrate what they have learned (e.g., concept mapping).
                          • Engagement to tap into diverse learners’ interests, challenge them appropriately, and motivate them to learn (choices among various scenarios for learning the same competency).
                        5. Include Multiple Learning Assessments While one assessment alone can generate evidence to make decisions about student learning and development, multiple measures encourage more comprehensive and accurate assessment. This benefits not only the students who are learning but also the instructors who are doing the teaching. Consider the following learning artifacts commonly used to assess student learning in online courses.
                        • Discussion Posts
                        • Groupwork Products
                        • Quizzes
                        • Exams
                        • Written or Video Assignments
                        • Digital Projects or Portfolios
                        Consider providing students with choices for assignments, such as what to write about for the assignment or how to respond to a discussion post or even which assignments they will complete. In conclusion, online course design requires concerted time and attention. To summarize some of the key points we have described, we have further developed our instructional alignment figure for online courses as follows: Try incorporating these teaching techniques into your online course design.

                        Background Knowledge Probe

                        View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:

                        Think Pair Share

                        View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:

                        Active Reading Documents

                        View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
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                          " ["post_title"]=> string(40) "5 Tips for Engaging Online Course Design" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(29) "engaging-online-course-design" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-07-10 00:53:56" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-07-10 00:53:56" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(34) "https://kpcrossacademy.org/?p=2179" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [8]=> object(WP_Post)#7930 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(816) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "4" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-05-09 19:26:20" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-05-09 19:26:20" ["post_content"]=> string(1570) "“Learning is not attained by chance, it must be sought for with ardor and attended to with diligence.” ~ Abigal Adams One of the most often cited works on learning, and one we refer to often, is John Bransford, Ann Brown, and Rodney Cocking’s 2000 work appropriately titled How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School. The report, which was commissioned by the National Research Council, presents research in cognitive science and connects the findings to implications for teaching and learning. You can find the full report, all 374 pages of it, here: https://www.nap.edu/read/9853/chapter/1 Helpfully, the staff at the Center for Teaching at Vanderbilt University have developed a teaching guide with highlights from the report. For their summary, see the following link: https://cft.vanderbilt.edu//cft/guides-sub-pages/how-people-learn/ The CFT staff hone in on the nature of expertise and the challenges students face as they seek to develop expertise. The staff suggest that teachers should seek to gauge student levels of knowledge and that we should also make our thinking visible to students so that we are modeling our expertise. We hope that you find these resources helpful. As always, if you know of an interesting resource that we should feature, please drop us a line at info@kpcrossacademy.org; we will of course credit you for the information you share.  " ["post_title"]=> string(14) "How They Learn" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(14) "how-they-learn" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 17:38:41" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 17:38:41" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(32) "http://kpcrossacademy.org/?p=816" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [9]=> object(WP_Post)#7648 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(1575) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "4" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 02:42:22" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 02:42:22" ["post_content"]=> string(9211) "The COVID-19 pandemic has led to many if not most college faculty teaching in virtual classrooms. While many of us are turning to synchronous lectures with video conferencing tools such as Zoom or Blackboard Collaborate, many of us are also choosing to create asynchronous video lectures that students can watch anytime, anywhere. There are many valid reasons for making this teach-from-home choice; among them are some students may have difficulty accessing synchronous class activities—they may be living in a different time zone, have limited internet access, among other reasons. The benefits of an asynchronous e-classroom setup, beyond time and place flexibility, include the fact that students can scan, search, and re-watch lectures. Moreover, as faculty, you have the luxury of time to think fully through what you are going to say ahead of time and afterward, to edit the videos so that you produce the best e-lecture product possible. A few effective ways to use asynchronous videos are:
                          • A welcome video
                          • An introduction to a topic or module
                          • A demonstration
                          • A description of a difficult concept
                          • A synthesis of material from the learning module or unit
                          A few choices that you have for creating videos at home on your phone or laptop are as follows:
                          • Narrated slide presentation. In this video format, slides are the only thing visible in the video. The teacher does a voiceover to accompany the slides. These are useful for presenting complicated material for which visuals will likely enhance students’ understanding. PowerPoint has a built-in feature for recording over slides, but it can be clunky to have to click play between each slide. A better option is to export to YouTube or Vimeo or use a screencast program such as Screencastomatic or Screencastify that you can also share to YouTube or Vimeo.
                          • Presenter-only lecture. In this kind of lecture, the instructor appears without other visual supports. This approach can make the instructor appear as a mere talking head if overdone. But they can be useful in short segments to add teacher presence to the course and help students feel like you are “there.” These can be done in a fairly low-tech way, such as through a smartphone video, Zoom, or Blackboard Collaborate recording done ahead of time.
                          • Slide presentation with presenter view. This approach is a combination of presenter and slide presentation, which allows you to capitalize on the benefits of both approaches. Programs such as Panopto and Tegrity provide a professional look, but you can also record in Zoom or other video conferencing programs ahead of time.
                          To create the most engaging asynchronous video presentations possible, be sure that you attend to the following issues:
                          1. Lighting: Make sure that you have ample lighting and that the light hits your face rather than coming from behind you.
                          2. Storyboards: If you are doing the lecture for the first time, consider creating a storyboard, which is simply a plan of what you will say, show, and describe. A good storyboard can provide you with a roadmap. Feel free to download and use our template.
                          3. Scripts: Develop a script of what you will say to ensure that you address the most important content. You can then use the script as the transcript of the video for accessibility purposes. If you would like to be more impromptu in your approach but need to create a transcript, consider using a program like Zoom that will allow you to record and change the settings to prepare a transcript, which you can then edit.
                          4. Slide Design. See our blog post on creating engaging synchronous lectures for tips on effective slide design for video lectures.
                          5. Copyright: Because your video will be tangible and long lasting, you need to ensure that you have permission to use all images, video, music, or other content that is not your own. You can find many free images and music through sources such as Creative Commons, Unsplash, or Pixabay. Just be sure to give credit where credit is due.
                          6. Shelf-Life: You may well want to use the video you create in the future, and you will be better able to do so if you are attentive to the shelf life of your content. While it may be virtually impossible not to mention the Coronavirus pandemic, consider limiting such references so that you are able to edit the information out later.
                          7. Learning Chunks: It is exceedingly difficult to watch long lectures, particularly on video. Try to break your lectures into no more than 10-minute chunks per video. If you simply cannot do this, consider asking students to stop the video to complete a task every 10 minutes.
                          8. Active Learning: While the video will be asynchronous, you can and should still expect students to learn actively while they are watching. Consider implementing the following techniques in your online class to break up your asynchronous video lecture and keep your students active and engaged:
                          • Guided Notes | View Technique →
                          • Quick WriteView Technique →
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                          It’s been said that the best tool is the one you actually have with you, but how useful that tool is really comes down to whether or not you know best how to use it. Bearing that in mind, this post is aimed at helping you best utilize the online teaching resources provided by the K. Patricia Cross Academy.
                          Video Sort Features
                          With a library of 50 technique videos covering a wide range of subject matter, seeking out a specific video never requires more than a few clicks when using the library’s advanced sorting features.  Even better, the filters are applied in real-time for a smoother browsing experience! Teaching Environment The broadest filter, ‘Teaching Environment’ allows you to select videos based on the intended teaching environment—in-person or online—and is a great way to lend a bit of direction to your general library browsing. Activity Type Do you already have a particular activity type in mind? If you’re looking to approach a certain lesson element in a different way, the ‘Activity Type’ filter allows for efficient browsing and discovery of videos covering activity-specific techniques as well as the resources needed to implement them into your lessons. Teaching Problem Addressed Looking for a way to target a specific issue you’re facing in the classroom? The ‘Teaching Problem Addressed’ filter allows you to find videos directly related to the various teaching challenges you face. Learning Taxonomic Dimension Great for organizing videos based on how they address individual elements of the broader learning process, the ‘Learning Taxonomic Dimension’ filter categorizes the entire video library according to which broader piece of the learning puzzle they address. 
                          Online Teaching Technique Videos
                          As the pandemic has dramatically accelerated the adoption of—and reliance on—online learning environments, tailoring teaching techniques to best utilize (and accommodate) the medium has become an essential skill for ensuring teaching and learning do not suffer outside of traditional learning environments. In order to help aid the transition, 38 online teaching technique videos (and counting) have been adapted to offer resources and instruction tailored specifically to the unique considerations presented by teaching and learning in an online environment. 
                          Subscribe to Our Newsletter
                          From topical insights on the issues facing today’s educators to more detailed discussions of some of the finer points of various teaching techniques, our monthly newsletter has been designed to deliver a wealth of tips, strategies, and knowledge directly to your inbox for FREE!

                            We're Here For You—And The Future of Higher Education
                            The K. Patricia Cross Academy is dedicated to supporting faculty in their effort to develop effective, high-impact teaching techniques that improve students' learning through an evidence-based approach.
                            Our instructional videos and downloadable resources have been designed to help both faculty and students, and they also represent our continued investment in the future of higher education. We hope these resources will help you in your efforts to teach both effectively and efficiently.
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                            What Do We Know About Student Experiences of Online Learning?
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                                  string(3855) "“Students don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care.” ~Anonymous
                            
                            Most of us chose careers in academia because we care deeply about our disciplines or fields. It can be discouraging, therefore, to face students whose indifference to our courses is palpable. Yet caring is an essential element of their learning. As Fink suggests, “When students care about something, they then have the energy they need for learning more about it and making it a part of their lives. Without the energy for learning, nothing significant happens.” Certainly, common sense and our own experience as teachers suggest that students who really care about what they are learning to invest the time and effort to learn it well and remember it longer.
                            
                            There is no easy way to get students to care. We offer some suggestions for your consideration:
                            
                            Be a Role Model For Caring
                            Students tend to respond to the level of energy and enthusiasm that you generate in kind. If you demonstrate that you are passionate about your subject and about teaching, as well as their learning, your students are more likely to connect with you and with the content and to strive to do their best.
                            Care About the Students
                            Most students will be motivated if they believe you care about them. Indeed, caring about the students as individuals is critical to their success as well as to their satisfaction with the course and with your teaching. Getting to know them is helpful on this front, as you can then target instruction to student background and interests.
                            Set High Expectations
                            Research is fairly clear that students appreciate it when a teacher has high expectations for them and hold them to it. In short, when they are expected to learn more and perform better, they often do. Students often perform in ways that their teachers expect.
                            Give Students Ownership in the Content and Process
                            If students have some flexibility in what they study and how they study it, they are more likely to care about both aspects. For example, if they choose paper and project topics that most interest them, and if they have some decision about the assessment (tests, papers, projects, posters, presentations), they have more control over how they develop understanding and how they demonstrate it to you. Control often leads to caring in this circumstance.
                            Encourage Students to Connect Content to Their Lives/the Outside World
                            Oftentimes to students, our courses can seem completely disconnected from their lived experiences. We can find ways to make connections more transparent. When they have the opportunity to see that content is important and relevant to them, they tend to care more.
                            Choose Assignments That are at the Appropriate Target Level
                            Students need to have assignments that are challenging enough to be interesting but not so difficult that they feel dazed, confused, and helpless. You can design assignments that are appropriately challenging in view of the experience and aptitude of the class.
                            Place Appropriate Emphasis on Testing and Grading
                            Graded items can create incentives or disincentives. You can strive for assessments that show students what they have mastered, rather than what they have not. College teachers can help promote students caring. For information about active learning techniques that promote caring, see our videos for the following techniques: " ["post_title"]=> string(45) "Getting Students to Care About Their Learning" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(45) "getting-students-to-care-about-their-learning" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 17:37:27" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 17:37:27" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(33) "http://kpcrossacademy.org/?p=1286" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [1]=> object(WP_Post)#8003 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(1221) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-12-09 00:42:35" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-12-09 00:42:35" ["post_content"]=> string(4189) "“Knowledge without application is like a book that is never read” ~Christopher Crawford As college teachers, we want students to think deeply about course content and skills, yet sometimes it feels like students never progress beyond surface-level understanding. One of the best ways to help students get to deeper learning is to have them use what they have learned in a new way. In his taxonomy of Significant Learning, Fink (2013) suggests that application means learning how to do some new kind of action. In his taxonomy, Bloom suggests that application means students take what they’ve learned and apply it to a different scenario, often one outside of the classroom. For example, students could use a math formula they’ve learned to calculate a family budget or apply a legal ruling to a specific case in news headlines. To make sure that students show they can apply what they learn, consider the following suggestions:
                            Be explicit about application
                            When engaging students in activities that promote the application of knowledge to new contexts, instructors should feel free to make their learning goals and expectations clear. Students will practice application better when they learn to recognize it. They will likely more willingly engage if the instructor explains the benefits of application for future learning and even career aspirations.
                            Focus on core concepts
                            Students can more effectively apply knowledge when they comprehend the core principles behind the content and skills that they need to use. You can develop activities to help students develop a deeper understanding of relationships, shared functions, or similar organizing principles prior to asking students to apply the material in new contexts.
                            Identify sub skills
                            Asking students to apply what they have learned can sound like a fairly easy task to accomplish, but in reality, it is complicated, and students may not have developed the skills they need to do it well. They need skills in differentiating, classifying, categorizing, organizing, and making attributions. They also need problem solving. It can be useful to scaffold application to highlight the subtasks until students become more comfortable with and clear on their roles and responsibilities.
                            Provide students with practice
                            Students develop the ability to apply their learning by practicing application. Instructors can present two different scenarios, formulas, or readings and ask students to find single approaches for solving or analyzing each. Alternately, they can ask students to construct a different problem or scenario that requires the same skills and knowledge as a pre-completed assignment.
                            Make it social and collaborative
                            Application of knowledge can be particularly effective when it is done in a cooperative social context that allows peers to develop explanations, provide each other with feedback, and share responsibility for learning. 
                            Involve students in the process
                            Students will be more invested in applying what they have learned if they are called upon to mindfully and explicitly search for ways to make connections, to classify, to sort, and so on. Likewise, they will be more invested if called upon to self monitor their progress and success in applying information in new ways. Self-reflection and self-assessment are great tools for accomplishing this goal. For information about active learning techniques that prompt students to apply knowledge, see our videos for the following techniques:  " ["post_title"]=> string(65) "Getting Students to Apply What They Have Learned in a New Context" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(65) "getting-students-to-apply-what-they-have-learned-in-a-new-context" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 17:37:38" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 17:37:38" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(33) "http://kpcrossacademy.org/?p=1221" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [2]=> object(WP_Post)#8005 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(6415) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "5" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2021-10-12 07:00:17" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2021-10-12 14:00:17" ["post_content"]=> string(4436) "
                            It’s been said that the best tool is the one you actually have with you, but how useful that tool is really comes down to whether or not you know best how to use it. Bearing that in mind, this post is aimed at helping you best utilize the online teaching resources provided by the K. Patricia Cross Academy.
                            Video Sort Features
                            With a library of 50 technique videos covering a wide range of subject matter, seeking out a specific video never requires more than a few clicks when using the library’s advanced sorting features.  Even better, the filters are applied in real-time for a smoother browsing experience! Teaching Environment The broadest filter, ‘Teaching Environment’ allows you to select videos based on the intended teaching environment—in-person or online—and is a great way to lend a bit of direction to your general library browsing. Activity Type Do you already have a particular activity type in mind? If you’re looking to approach a certain lesson element in a different way, the ‘Activity Type’ filter allows for efficient browsing and discovery of videos covering activity-specific techniques as well as the resources needed to implement them into your lessons. Teaching Problem Addressed Looking for a way to target a specific issue you’re facing in the classroom? The ‘Teaching Problem Addressed’ filter allows you to find videos directly related to the various teaching challenges you face. Learning Taxonomic Dimension Great for organizing videos based on how they address individual elements of the broader learning process, the ‘Learning Taxonomic Dimension’ filter categorizes the entire video library according to which broader piece of the learning puzzle they address. 
                            Online Teaching Technique Videos
                            As the pandemic has dramatically accelerated the adoption of—and reliance on—online learning environments, tailoring teaching techniques to best utilize (and accommodate) the medium has become an essential skill for ensuring teaching and learning do not suffer outside of traditional learning environments. In order to help aid the transition, 38 online teaching technique videos (and counting) have been adapted to offer resources and instruction tailored specifically to the unique considerations presented by teaching and learning in an online environment. 
                            Subscribe to Our Newsletter
                            From topical insights on the issues facing today’s educators to more detailed discussions of some of the finer points of various teaching techniques, our monthly newsletter has been designed to deliver a wealth of tips, strategies, and knowledge directly to your inbox for FREE!

                              We're Here For You—And The Future of Higher Education
                              The K. Patricia Cross Academy is dedicated to supporting faculty in their effort to develop effective, high-impact teaching techniques that improve students' learning through an evidence-based approach.
                              Our instructional videos and downloadable resources have been designed to help both faculty and students, and they also represent our continued investment in the future of higher education. We hope these resources will help you in your efforts to teach both effectively and efficiently.
                              " ["post_title"]=> string(69) "3 Tips For Making the Most of Cross Academy Online Teaching Resources" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(44) "3-tips-for-making-the-most-of-kpca-resources" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2021-10-12 10:37:30" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2021-10-12 17:37:30" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(34) "https://kpcrossacademy.org/?p=6415" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [3]=> object(WP_Post)#7993 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(2588) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-09-09 11:00:45" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-09-09 11:00:45" ["post_content"]=> string(9963) "

                              Higher education institutions have been scrambling to meet the demand for remote and online courses. This has been due in part to general growth trends in online enrollment, but it has also been accelerated out of response to the Covid-19 pandemic. Because of this, we have focused on helping faculty teach more effectively online.

                              In this blog, we turn our attention to the learning experiences these courses provide students. Understanding students' experiences in online courses has implications on the effectiveness of teaching strategies. A look at published research shows several factors related to the quality of student experiences that faculty can address when developing their online courses.

                              Research on Student Experiences Online

                              Instructor Availability and Accessibility

                              Instructor accessibility is an important theme that emerges in research on student experiences of online learning. Students who have positive experiences tend to describe instructors as “being there,” “being quick to respond,” “responding within 24 hours,” and “bending over backwards to help.” They also share that instructors who are readily available are helpful to their learning and that they appreciate that these instructors are accessible for answering questions. Students describe these instructors as being clear and as communicating frequently.

                              Unfortunately, not all students have positive experiences with their online instructors. Students say their learning suffers when their professors are absent. Students with negative experiences in online learning describe their instructors as, “quite invisible” and “you didn’t see them.” Instructor absence makes students feel that the professors are “not interested in us,” and thus the students are less likely to approach them for help or to ask any questions. This leaves students feeling that their instructor does not think that they or their learning is important.

                              Instructors should consider how to make themselves present and available when teaching online.  There are many ways to be there for students in online courses. For example, you can include a welcome, add your bio, contribute to discussions, and give timely feedback on student work.

                              Student Time Management

                              One of the most valuable skills online students can have is effective time management. The better that students manage their learning time, the easier it is for them to achieve their learning goals. Without the camaraderie of a class to motivate them or having a set time where they need to be on campus, effective time management is crucial to staying focused. Those who have good skills in this area tend to feel prepared for online learning and tend to feel that they can manage and learn online.

                              Some students express concern about their abilities to manage their time in online courses, however. When they come into online learning without effective time management skills, they may not remember to log in. They may not work sufficiently in advance to meet deadlines. Indeed, they may forget deadlines altogether. Obviously, lacking these essential skills can have a negative effect on their learning. Having an instructor who can help them, however, can mitigate the lack of skills.

                              Instructors should think through how to help students better time manage and how to help them develop the skills to do so. Consider using Lecture Engagement Logs. These are records that guide students in documenting the work they should be doing before, during, and after a lecture, but they can easily be adapted to scaffold work in conjunction with other course activities.

                              Lecture Engagement Logs View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:

                              Collaborative Learning

                              Many students who are learning online want opportunities to connect with peers, and for good reason. One of the challenges students most often describe attending their learning online is the feeling of “isolation.” One student described such feelings as follows:

                              I feel isolated; I do not know my fellow learners well and I do not have the courage to phone them, to see if they feel the same distress as me, the same fears. I do not even dare to phone my instructor…The nature of distance learning makes me see everything from a distance.

                              Another student in an online course said this, “I haven’t talked with much of anybody this semester” and another said they “didn’t feel connected.” Another put it this way: “I have felt it . . . panic. . . isolation . . . frustration . . . anger.” Instances of isolation are often related to lack of communication or connection in the online classroom. Clearly these feelings can have a negative effect on student learning.

                              Students themselves appear to recognize that the social connection is critical to their learning. One student explained it this way:

                              It was pretty important to know that there were people out there who were feeling the same thing … It was a little bit scary. I was thinking can I do it; can’t I do it? … This might sound a little bit perverse, but it was reassuring to know that other people were feeling the same thing; that it was quite normal.

                              Students recognize that not only is the connection with the instructor important then, but it is also important that they establish and maintain connection with each other.

                              So, what is to be done? Collaborative learning involves two or more people working in a group to learn something together. Students who participate in collaborative learning capitalize on one another's knowledge and skills. Usually, students working collaboratively search for understanding or meaning, solutions to problems, or they create a product. Collaborative learning tasks vary widely, but most often, they center on students’ exploration or application of the course material. Collaborative learning, at least on low stakes activities, can be critical in an online course. Consider for example trying a Jigsaw in your online course. In Jigsaw, students work in small groups to develop knowledge about a given topic before teaching what they have learned to another group.

                              Jigsaw View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
                              Conclusion

                              In conclusion, students take online courses for a number of reasons, and in the middle of a global pandemic, one of those reasons is that they simply have to in order to continue their education. Several factors influence their experience, some of which faculty have direct influence over. Instructors should work to establish presence in the absence of physical co-presence, work to help students manage their time and efforts in learning, and strive to create a sense of community.

                              Reference:

                              Blackmon, S. J. & Major, C. H. (2012). Student experiences in online courses: A qualitative research synthesis. Quarterly Review of Distance Education, 13(2), 77-85.

                              " ["post_title"]=> string(61) "What Do We Know About Student Experiences of Online Learning?" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(60) "what-do-we-know-about-student-experiences-of-online-learning" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2022-01-07 15:05:27" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2022-01-07 23:05:27" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(34) "https://kpcrossacademy.org/?p=2588" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [4]=> object(WP_Post)#7996 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(2688) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "5" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-11-10 07:02:20" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-11-10 07:02:20" ["post_content"]=> string(9647) "Active learning has come of age in higher education, with many educators adopting this method of teaching in their courses and with many studies documenting its effectiveness as an instructional approach. But what is active learning anyway? And given the fact that so many of us are teaching online, what does it look like in an online course? Descriptions of active learning in general are broad and imprecise. Several commonly cited definitions of active learning are as follows:
                              • Anything that involves students in doing things and thinking about the things they are doing (Bonwell & Eison, 1991).
                              • A process whereby students engage in activities, such as reading, writing, discussion, or problem solving that promote analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of class content (University of Michigan, Center for Research on Teaching and Learning, 2016)
                              • A process of learning through activities and/or discussion in class, as opposed to passively listening to an expert. It emphasizes higher-order thinking and often involves group work (Freeman, et al., 2014).
                              We have argued for a broader understanding of active learning than simply associating the term with an instructional approach, activity, or technique in several books in the College Teaching Techniques series. In so doing, we suggested that active learning involves making students dynamic participants in their own learning in ways that require them to integrate new information into their personal knowledge and experience. We suspect that what promotes active learning is different for different learners, but in general, we suggest that students are active learners when they are engaged in their learning in one or more of the following ways.

                              Students are active learners when they:

                              • Use sophisticated learning strategies
                              • Seek deep, conceptual understanding rather than surface knowledge
                              • Use learning strategies with personal relevance
                              • Use self-regulatory and metacognitive strategies
                              • Seek to share personal perspectives
                              • Seek to understand others’ perspectives
                              • Demonstrate curiosity, interest, and enthusiasm
                              • Offer input or suggestions
                              •  Seek out additional and further opportunities for learning
                              Although active learning can happen anywhere and at any time, we propose that when identifying an approach to promote active learning in a college course, teachers should consider two components: a learning task and a goal for the level of activity involved. By learning task, we mean an academic activity that an instructor has intentionally designed for students to do to help them meet important learning outcomes. We believe that the task can include listening to a lecture; after all, there is a body of work on active listening. The challenge is to make sure that students are using those higher-level listening skills, rather than just hearing the facts. That brings us to our second construct, level of activity, by which we mean students’ mental investment and the strategies they use to reflect on and monitor the processes and the results of their learning. Level of activity is a discrete component because one type of learning task does not necessarily demand more mental investment than another; rather, each type of learning task can require more or less mental activity depending on the individual learner as well as the content and design of the specific task. For example, although some educators argue that students who are listening to a lecture are necessarily learning more passively than those who are solving problems, consider the following problem: X + 3 = 5. Most college students can solve this problem without too much mental activity.
                              However, college students who are listening carefully to a highly engaging lecture can have high levels of mental activity, including focused attention, curiosity, empathy, critical thinking, and so forth. Thus, students can have low to high levels of mental activity in any given learning task and any given learning task can require and result in more or less active learning from students.
                              We offer our own conception of the active learning continuum for several key learning tasks in the following Table:   Viewed in this way, the term active learning can and should include the learning that can occur when students are listening to a lecture. If students learn something during a lecture, they have been mentally active, whether through listening, remembering, questioning, contemplating, or other. They likely have also been involved in activities such as note-taking, and in our model of interactive lectures, they will participate in additional activities, such as discussing and problem-solving. The challenge, then, is to help students move from level 1 (low) to level 3 (high) on the continuum in terms of their mental activity, whatever the learning task happens to be. So what does this look like online? We suggest that the mechanism itself is much the same as it is onsite. Faculty should choose the task, select a technique that helps students achieve the learning goal with a high level of mental activity (which you can do by sorting our videos by activity type.) To get started, consider the following active learning techniques:
                              Active Reading Documents
                              Carefully prepared forms that guide students through the process of critical and careful reading. View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
                              Online Resource Scavenger Hunt
                              Students use the internet to engage in fact-finding and information processing exercises using instructor-specified library and Internet sources. View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
                              Quick Write
                              Quick Write is a learning assessment technique where learners respond to an open-ended prompt. View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
                              Case Studies
                              In Case Studies student teams review a real-life problem scenario in depth. Team members apply course concepts to identify and evaluate alternative approaches to solving the problem. View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
                              Thus, we encourage faculty who are new to teaching online to put pedagogy first and to be very intentional in their efforts to promote active learning. That is, consider what the learning goal is, what the learning task is, and what technique you can use to accomplish it. After you make these determinations, next you can consider what tool can facilitate your teaching and promote active learning most effectively. To sign up for our newsletter, where you will receive information about new blog posts, click here:

                                Reference Barkley, E. F., & Major, C. H. (2018). Interactive lecturing: A handbook for college faculty. San Francisco: Jossey Bass/Wiley." ["post_title"]=> string(48) "4 Techniques to Encourage Active Learning Online" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(22) "active-learning-online" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-12-01 00:11:03" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-12-01 00:11:03" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(34) "https://kpcrossacademy.org/?p=2688" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [5]=> object(WP_Post)#7997 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(472) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2018-11-26 21:34:26" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2018-11-26 21:34:26" ["post_content"]=> string(1524) "Creating or revising a syllabus can be fun. You get to think through what students should learn in the course, what content they will review, what skills they will practice, and what assignments they will complete during the term. One of the most tedious aspects of creating or revising a syllabus, though, is figuring out and filling in the dates each semester, particularly if you have a class that meets, or in the case of online courses has assignments due, multiple times a week. Cue the generic syllabus date finder, created by Caleb McDaniel and hosted on the Rice University Web site at the following URL: http://wcaleb.rice.edu/syllabusmaker/generic/ This simple tool will prompt you to enter the year of your course, the start and end date, and the days on which you will meet (or have work due from students). Once you fill in the relevant information, hitting “submit” will result in a list of dates for the term and will save you the time of having to find them on a calendar. We hope you find this tool useful! As always, if you know of an interesting resource that we should feature, please drop us a line at info@kpcrossacademy.org; we will of course credit you for the information you share." ["post_title"]=> string(31) "It's Not Always in the Syllabus" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(30) "its-not-always-in-the-syllabus" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 17:59:33" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 17:59:33" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(32) "https://kpci.wpengine.com/?p=472" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [6]=> object(WP_Post)#7999 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(3677) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2021-03-10 07:00:03" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2021-03-10 15:00:03" ["post_content"]=> string(8959) "The COVID-19 pandemic and its surrounding political climate find us all in a time of crisis. Teachers and students alike are often caring for family members, friends, and themselves. That students are doing so while continuing their studies demonstrates that they do care, and they likely care deeply, for the people in their lives. But with the distractions brought about during this time of crisis, it can be a challenge for them to focus their care additionally on their studies. As educators, we know there is a strong relationship between caring about learning and quality of learning. As Fink argues, “When students care about something, they then have the energy they need for learning more about it and making it a part of their lives. Without the energy for learning, nothing significant happens” (2013, p. 360). It seems simple common sense that students who really care about what they are learning will invest the time and effort required to learn it well and remember it longer. So how do we help students focus their care on learning, during a crisis, during an age of significant distraction?
                                What Does Caring Mean During a Crisis?
                                When we care about something, we have acquired an affective disposition toward it that combines concern and perhaps even affection: we value it, appreciate it, and anticipate opportunities to encounter it.  “Caring” in education refers to the degree to which students are interested in, or have feelings about, various aspects of their learning, and it can apply to an array of foci that include topic-specific phenomena and ideas, human beings, and the process of learning itself. It means the focusing of consciousness and the narrowing of attention on learning We often know when students care about their learning. If students care about a course, they will show up for it and will invest appropriate time and energy into the learning activities.  If students care about their peers, they will listen actively when others speak and demonstrate compassion and empathy as they develop deeper understanding of another’s perspectives or experiences. If students care about the topic, they will ask pertinent questions and be sufficiently curious to go beyond the minimum class requirements. How does all this work when they simply don’t have the physical stamina, time, cognitive bandwidth, or emotional energy for the learning?
                                How Do We Get Students to Care about Learning during a Crisis?
                                Following are suggestions for promoting caring in college and university courses during a crisis: 1. Acknowledge the Crisis and How You are Addressing It. It will help students to care if they know that you care, too, and that you understand where they are coming from. Tell them how you have adapted the course or activities and explain how you hope they will adapt in turn. 2. Humanize the Course. Particularly if you are teaching online, make sure that you have a warm and inviting space for students. You also need to be there and show your personality. Helping students to make connections with you and with each other builds community in the class and can help students to care more about their own work. Being there and forming that community is likely the most essential element of caring in a time of crisis. 3. Reconsider Rigor. Rigor is important, but be sure that you aren’t focusing excessively on it. It’s important to balance rigor with being supportive of students and their learning during this time. Think through how you can provide a quality learning experience during these unique circumstances. Students are more likely to care if they believe that you aren’t out to prove how tough you and the course are, but instead are doing your best to ensure they learn. 4. Make it Manageable. Provide a clear structure and a clear schedule. Give students challenges that increase in difficulty incrementally. One reason that students fail to care is that they believe that they can't or won’t be successful. One way to negate that is to give them small challenges so they can be successful in completing them and then build difficulty and complexity over time. 5. Stay Positive. There are many things to be negative about right now, but your course, content, and student learning aren’t part of that. You can help ensure that students care by staying positive about the learning. Consider using positive language, for example, talking about what they will gain from the course and how they will use it in the future or when we return to the “new normal.” 6. Provide Students with Choice and Autonomy. Provide students with choices so that they feel more invested. For example, you might let students choose which discussions to participate in, or you might give them options about how to participate, for example by sharing something they have created or by responding to a prompt with an essay. 7. Make sure Tasks are Relevant, Appropriate, and Worthy of Their Attention. Characteristics of a learning task can increase or decrease student caring. For example, consider the following questions: Is the task inherently interesting? Is it important to the students on a personal level? Can they make a connection between the task and their own lived experiences? Is there some novelty to it? Is the purpose clear? Is it important to them? Is it a creative activity? Is there enough time to successfully complete the task?
                                Cross Academy Techniques to Promote Caring
                                Consider the following techniques that promote caring and also provide students with ways to demonstrate caring about the topic or their learning: Three-Minute Message: 3-Minute Messages are modeled on the Three-Minute Thesis (3MT) academic competition, in which students have three minutes to present a compelling argument and to support it with convincing details and examples. View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
                                Briefing Paper: In a Briefing Paper, students research a current problem of their choice, summarize the main issues, and present solutions to a specific audience. View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
                                What? So What? Now What? Journals: In What? So What? Now What? Journals, students reflect on their recent course-related activities as they respond to each prompt in a journal entry. View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
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                                  " ["post_title"]=> string(68) "7 Steps to Help Students Care About Learning During a Time of Crisis" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(41) "helping-students-care-in-a-time-of-crisis" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2021-03-10 09:28:09" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2021-03-10 17:28:09" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(34) "https://kpcrossacademy.org/?p=3677" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [7]=> object(WP_Post)#7974 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(2179) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "5" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-07-08 01:39:18" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-07-08 01:39:18" ["post_content"]=> string(11234) "After years - even decades - of teaching onsite, many instructors are able to teach a traditional, classroom-based course without having laid out the entire course in advance. This approach doesn’t work well in the online classroom, however, as online course delivery requires more fully developing the course ahead of time. Thus, when teaching online, the process of course design is essential. Online course design requires a wide range of skills and tools and managing both the design and the technical aspects of the course. A Brief Overview of Online Course Design When engaging in course design, the concept of instructional alignment is useful to consider. Instructional alignment begins with the identification of learning goals. Those goals then direct other decisions, including how you will help students achieve these goals (materials and methods), what tools can best help you help students achieve them (technologies), and how you will know if the goals have been met (assessment). We illustrate the idea of instructional alignment in online courses in the following figure: In this model, one element leads to the next. For example, if you are teaching an English class, you might have a learning goal of critical thinking, with a specific objective that learners will critically evaluate a play. Your learning materials might include the specific play to be evaluated as well as an article or chapter describing a model of critical evaluation. For your learning activities, you might ask learners to read the materials and then practice critical evaluation through Active Reading Documents in which your questions lead students through a critical analysis that prepares them to then write a report on their own. For the technology, you might use a Learning Management System (LMS) and have the materials available within it as well as a downloadable template for the Active Reading Documents. For the assessment, students might write a formal report using the evaluation model to critically evaluate the play. All of these key elements in the instructional alignment model should be determined before an online course goes live. The following are tips related to instructional alignment during course design. 1. Develop Course and Module Learning Goals and Objectives Most of us are familiar with the idea of developing course goals and objectives; after all, we usually have to include course level goals and objectives in every syllabus we create. But not all of us are as familiar with developing goals for specific learning modules. When we teach online, developing, and then displaying more targeted micro-goals for specific modules helps make our learning expectations clear. 2. Use Multiple Media for Learning Materials Traditionally, many of us share content by asking students to read a chapter or article and then we elaborate by presenting additional content through lectures. We can accomplish these forms of sharing content in similar ways online. Many resources are available to present text versions of lectures, and we can also present either synchronous lectures through video conferencing or asynchronous pre-recorded video lectures online. In addition, there are a range of free resources available online, such as pre-recorded videos and free open educational resources (OERs). A mix of media (text, video, audio, graphics) is typically more effective than using only one type because the variety can help keep students more engaged. 3. Choose Appropriate Learning Tasks It is important to think through what students will do in your online course. Common instructional tasks in online courses include the following:
                                  • Connect—Activate students’ prior knowledge of the content so that learners can make better connections to new content through an activity such as a Background Knowledge Probe.
                                  • Learn/Watch/Read— Provide learners with the new content.
                                  • Practice—Implement activities that reinforce their new learning.
                                  • Share/Discuss—Enable students to find personal relevance and share their experiences with their peers, perhaps through a discussion thread. Consider for example using a Think-Pair-Share.
                                  • Assess—Ask students to demonstrate learning, whether through a quiz, assignment, project, or other.
                                  • Reflect— Challenge students to reflect on what they have learned.
                                  Aim for having the same kinds of activities due on the same days of the week. If for example, you do a discussion board each week, choose the day when students will post (for example have discussions due on Wednesday and responses due on Friday). If they have an assessment to complete each week, choose a different due day for that activity (for example, have the assessment due on Thursday), and so forth. 4. Humanize the Technology Technology can serve as a mediator between people. A few suggestions for accomplishing this are as follows:
                                  • Simplify the NavigationMany Learning Management Systems make choices for you, including what will be in the navigation bar. Think through how students will work their way through the course and what students really need to see in the navigation menu. Unnecessary items can result in overwhelmed students. Providing clarity and ensuring intuitive organization of materials can improve learner satisfaction as well as promoting deeper learning.
                                  • Strive for a Humanized Look and FeelThere is a tendency in online courses to use built-in icons and heavy text. Graphics, images, and short videos can create a warmer look and a more human-friendly feel to the course.
                                  • Ensure Accessibility—Effective online courses should be accessible to all learners. One way to do this is to make sure courses are “universally designed.” Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is built on the idea that all learning experiences should be purposefully constructed to be “barrier free” and accessible by providing multiple and flexible methods of the following elements:
                                    • Presentation of content (e.g., voice-to-text applications, screen readers, digital books).
                                    • Alternatives for students to demonstrate what they have learned (e.g., concept mapping).
                                    • Engagement to tap into diverse learners’ interests, challenge them appropriately, and motivate them to learn (choices among various scenarios for learning the same competency).
                                  5. Include Multiple Learning Assessments While one assessment alone can generate evidence to make decisions about student learning and development, multiple measures encourage more comprehensive and accurate assessment. This benefits not only the students who are learning but also the instructors who are doing the teaching. Consider the following learning artifacts commonly used to assess student learning in online courses.
                                  • Discussion Posts
                                  • Groupwork Products
                                  • Quizzes
                                  • Exams
                                  • Written or Video Assignments
                                  • Digital Projects or Portfolios
                                  Consider providing students with choices for assignments, such as what to write about for the assignment or how to respond to a discussion post or even which assignments they will complete. In conclusion, online course design requires concerted time and attention. To summarize some of the key points we have described, we have further developed our instructional alignment figure for online courses as follows: Try incorporating these teaching techniques into your online course design.

                                  Background Knowledge Probe

                                  View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:

                                  Think Pair Share

                                  View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:

                                  Active Reading Documents

                                  View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
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                                    " ["post_title"]=> string(40) "5 Tips for Engaging Online Course Design" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(29) "engaging-online-course-design" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-07-10 00:53:56" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-07-10 00:53:56" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(34) "https://kpcrossacademy.org/?p=2179" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [8]=> object(WP_Post)#7930 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(816) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "4" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-05-09 19:26:20" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-05-09 19:26:20" ["post_content"]=> string(1570) "“Learning is not attained by chance, it must be sought for with ardor and attended to with diligence.” ~ Abigal Adams One of the most often cited works on learning, and one we refer to often, is John Bransford, Ann Brown, and Rodney Cocking’s 2000 work appropriately titled How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School. The report, which was commissioned by the National Research Council, presents research in cognitive science and connects the findings to implications for teaching and learning. You can find the full report, all 374 pages of it, here: https://www.nap.edu/read/9853/chapter/1 Helpfully, the staff at the Center for Teaching at Vanderbilt University have developed a teaching guide with highlights from the report. For their summary, see the following link: https://cft.vanderbilt.edu//cft/guides-sub-pages/how-people-learn/ The CFT staff hone in on the nature of expertise and the challenges students face as they seek to develop expertise. The staff suggest that teachers should seek to gauge student levels of knowledge and that we should also make our thinking visible to students so that we are modeling our expertise. We hope that you find these resources helpful. As always, if you know of an interesting resource that we should feature, please drop us a line at info@kpcrossacademy.org; we will of course credit you for the information you share.  " ["post_title"]=> string(14) "How They Learn" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(14) "how-they-learn" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 17:38:41" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 17:38:41" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(32) "http://kpcrossacademy.org/?p=816" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [9]=> object(WP_Post)#7648 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(1575) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "4" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 02:42:22" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 02:42:22" ["post_content"]=> string(9211) "The COVID-19 pandemic has led to many if not most college faculty teaching in virtual classrooms. While many of us are turning to synchronous lectures with video conferencing tools such as Zoom or Blackboard Collaborate, many of us are also choosing to create asynchronous video lectures that students can watch anytime, anywhere. There are many valid reasons for making this teach-from-home choice; among them are some students may have difficulty accessing synchronous class activities—they may be living in a different time zone, have limited internet access, among other reasons. The benefits of an asynchronous e-classroom setup, beyond time and place flexibility, include the fact that students can scan, search, and re-watch lectures. Moreover, as faculty, you have the luxury of time to think fully through what you are going to say ahead of time and afterward, to edit the videos so that you produce the best e-lecture product possible. A few effective ways to use asynchronous videos are:
                                    • A welcome video
                                    • An introduction to a topic or module
                                    • A demonstration
                                    • A description of a difficult concept
                                    • A synthesis of material from the learning module or unit
                                    A few choices that you have for creating videos at home on your phone or laptop are as follows:
                                    • Narrated slide presentation. In this video format, slides are the only thing visible in the video. The teacher does a voiceover to accompany the slides. These are useful for presenting complicated material for which visuals will likely enhance students’ understanding. PowerPoint has a built-in feature for recording over slides, but it can be clunky to have to click play between each slide. A better option is to export to YouTube or Vimeo or use a screencast program such as Screencastomatic or Screencastify that you can also share to YouTube or Vimeo.
                                    • Presenter-only lecture. In this kind of lecture, the instructor appears without other visual supports. This approach can make the instructor appear as a mere talking head if overdone. But they can be useful in short segments to add teacher presence to the course and help students feel like you are “there.” These can be done in a fairly low-tech way, such as through a smartphone video, Zoom, or Blackboard Collaborate recording done ahead of time.
                                    • Slide presentation with presenter view. This approach is a combination of presenter and slide presentation, which allows you to capitalize on the benefits of both approaches. Programs such as Panopto and Tegrity provide a professional look, but you can also record in Zoom or other video conferencing programs ahead of time.
                                    To create the most engaging asynchronous video presentations possible, be sure that you attend to the following issues:
                                    1. Lighting: Make sure that you have ample lighting and that the light hits your face rather than coming from behind you.
                                    2. Storyboards: If you are doing the lecture for the first time, consider creating a storyboard, which is simply a plan of what you will say, show, and describe. A good storyboard can provide you with a roadmap. Feel free to download and use our template.
                                    3. Scripts: Develop a script of what you will say to ensure that you address the most important content. You can then use the script as the transcript of the video for accessibility purposes. If you would like to be more impromptu in your approach but need to create a transcript, consider using a program like Zoom that will allow you to record and change the settings to prepare a transcript, which you can then edit.
                                    4. Slide Design. See our blog post on creating engaging synchronous lectures for tips on effective slide design for video lectures.
                                    5. Copyright: Because your video will be tangible and long lasting, you need to ensure that you have permission to use all images, video, music, or other content that is not your own. You can find many free images and music through sources such as Creative Commons, Unsplash, or Pixabay. Just be sure to give credit where credit is due.
                                    6. Shelf-Life: You may well want to use the video you create in the future, and you will be better able to do so if you are attentive to the shelf life of your content. While it may be virtually impossible not to mention the Coronavirus pandemic, consider limiting such references so that you are able to edit the information out later.
                                    7. Learning Chunks: It is exceedingly difficult to watch long lectures, particularly on video. Try to break your lectures into no more than 10-minute chunks per video. If you simply cannot do this, consider asking students to stop the video to complete a task every 10 minutes.
                                    8. Active Learning: While the video will be asynchronous, you can and should still expect students to learn actively while they are watching. Consider implementing the following techniques in your online class to break up your asynchronous video lecture and keep your students active and engaged:
                                    • Guided Notes | View Technique →
                                    • Quick WriteView Technique →
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                                    Higher education institutions have been scrambling to meet the demand for remote and online courses. This has been due in part to general growth trends in online enrollment, but it has also been accelerated out of response to the Covid-19 pandemic. Because of this, we have focused on helping faculty teach more effectively online.

                                    In this blog, we turn our attention to the learning experiences these courses provide students. Understanding students' experiences in online courses has implications on the effectiveness of teaching strategies. A look at published research shows several factors related to the quality of student experiences that faculty can address when developing their online courses.

                                    Research on Student Experiences Online

                                    Instructor Availability and Accessibility

                                    Instructor accessibility is an important theme that emerges in research on student experiences of online learning. Students who have positive experiences tend to describe instructors as “being there,” “being quick to respond,” “responding within 24 hours,” and “bending over backwards to help.” They also share that instructors who are readily available are helpful to their learning and that they appreciate that these instructors are accessible for answering questions. Students describe these instructors as being clear and as communicating frequently.

                                    Unfortunately, not all students have positive experiences with their online instructors. Students say their learning suffers when their professors are absent. Students with negative experiences in online learning describe their instructors as, “quite invisible” and “you didn’t see them.” Instructor absence makes students feel that the professors are “not interested in us,” and thus the students are less likely to approach them for help or to ask any questions. This leaves students feeling that their instructor does not think that they or their learning is important.

                                    Instructors should consider how to make themselves present and available when teaching online.  There are many ways to be there for students in online courses. For example, you can include a welcome, add your bio, contribute to discussions, and give timely feedback on student work.

                                    Student Time Management

                                    One of the most valuable skills online students can have is effective time management. The better that students manage their learning time, the easier it is for them to achieve their learning goals. Without the camaraderie of a class to motivate them or having a set time where they need to be on campus, effective time management is crucial to staying focused. Those who have good skills in this area tend to feel prepared for online learning and tend to feel that they can manage and learn online.

                                    Some students express concern about their abilities to manage their time in online courses, however. When they come into online learning without effective time management skills, they may not remember to log in. They may not work sufficiently in advance to meet deadlines. Indeed, they may forget deadlines altogether. Obviously, lacking these essential skills can have a negative effect on their learning. Having an instructor who can help them, however, can mitigate the lack of skills.

                                    Instructors should think through how to help students better time manage and how to help them develop the skills to do so. Consider using Lecture Engagement Logs. These are records that guide students in documenting the work they should be doing before, during, and after a lecture, but they can easily be adapted to scaffold work in conjunction with other course activities.

                                    Lecture Engagement Logs View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:

                                    Collaborative Learning

                                    Many students who are learning online want opportunities to connect with peers, and for good reason. One of the challenges students most often describe attending their learning online is the feeling of “isolation.” One student described such feelings as follows:

                                    I feel isolated; I do not know my fellow learners well and I do not have the courage to phone them, to see if they feel the same distress as me, the same fears. I do not even dare to phone my instructor…The nature of distance learning makes me see everything from a distance.

                                    Another student in an online course said this, “I haven’t talked with much of anybody this semester” and another said they “didn’t feel connected.” Another put it this way: “I have felt it . . . panic. . . isolation . . . frustration . . . anger.” Instances of isolation are often related to lack of communication or connection in the online classroom. Clearly these feelings can have a negative effect on student learning.

                                    Students themselves appear to recognize that the social connection is critical to their learning. One student explained it this way:

                                    It was pretty important to know that there were people out there who were feeling the same thing … It was a little bit scary. I was thinking can I do it; can’t I do it? … This might sound a little bit perverse, but it was reassuring to know that other people were feeling the same thing; that it was quite normal.

                                    Students recognize that not only is the connection with the instructor important then, but it is also important that they establish and maintain connection with each other.

                                    So, what is to be done? Collaborative learning involves two or more people working in a group to learn something together. Students who participate in collaborative learning capitalize on one another's knowledge and skills. Usually, students working collaboratively search for understanding or meaning, solutions to problems, or they create a product. Collaborative learning tasks vary widely, but most often, they center on students’ exploration or application of the course material. Collaborative learning, at least on low stakes activities, can be critical in an online course. Consider for example trying a Jigsaw in your online course. In Jigsaw, students work in small groups to develop knowledge about a given topic before teaching what they have learned to another group.

                                    Jigsaw View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
                                    Conclusion

                                    In conclusion, students take online courses for a number of reasons, and in the middle of a global pandemic, one of those reasons is that they simply have to in order to continue their education. Several factors influence their experience, some of which faculty have direct influence over. Instructors should work to establish presence in the absence of physical co-presence, work to help students manage their time and efforts in learning, and strive to create a sense of community.

                                    Reference:

                                    Blackmon, S. J. & Major, C. H. (2012). Student experiences in online courses: A qualitative research synthesis. Quarterly Review of Distance Education, 13(2), 77-85.

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                                    4 Techniques to Encourage Active Learning Online
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                                          ["post_content"]=>
                                          string(3855) "“Students don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care.” ~Anonymous
                                    
                                    Most of us chose careers in academia because we care deeply about our disciplines or fields. It can be discouraging, therefore, to face students whose indifference to our courses is palpable. Yet caring is an essential element of their learning. As Fink suggests, “When students care about something, they then have the energy they need for learning more about it and making it a part of their lives. Without the energy for learning, nothing significant happens.” Certainly, common sense and our own experience as teachers suggest that students who really care about what they are learning to invest the time and effort to learn it well and remember it longer.
                                    
                                    There is no easy way to get students to care. We offer some suggestions for your consideration:
                                    
                                    Be a Role Model For Caring
                                    Students tend to respond to the level of energy and enthusiasm that you generate in kind. If you demonstrate that you are passionate about your subject and about teaching, as well as their learning, your students are more likely to connect with you and with the content and to strive to do their best.
                                    Care About the Students
                                    Most students will be motivated if they believe you care about them. Indeed, caring about the students as individuals is critical to their success as well as to their satisfaction with the course and with your teaching. Getting to know them is helpful on this front, as you can then target instruction to student background and interests.
                                    Set High Expectations
                                    Research is fairly clear that students appreciate it when a teacher has high expectations for them and hold them to it. In short, when they are expected to learn more and perform better, they often do. Students often perform in ways that their teachers expect.
                                    Give Students Ownership in the Content and Process
                                    If students have some flexibility in what they study and how they study it, they are more likely to care about both aspects. For example, if they choose paper and project topics that most interest them, and if they have some decision about the assessment (tests, papers, projects, posters, presentations), they have more control over how they develop understanding and how they demonstrate it to you. Control often leads to caring in this circumstance.
                                    Encourage Students to Connect Content to Their Lives/the Outside World
                                    Oftentimes to students, our courses can seem completely disconnected from their lived experiences. We can find ways to make connections more transparent. When they have the opportunity to see that content is important and relevant to them, they tend to care more.
                                    Choose Assignments That are at the Appropriate Target Level
                                    Students need to have assignments that are challenging enough to be interesting but not so difficult that they feel dazed, confused, and helpless. You can design assignments that are appropriately challenging in view of the experience and aptitude of the class.
                                    Place Appropriate Emphasis on Testing and Grading
                                    Graded items can create incentives or disincentives. You can strive for assessments that show students what they have mastered, rather than what they have not. College teachers can help promote students caring. For information about active learning techniques that promote caring, see our videos for the following techniques: " ["post_title"]=> string(45) "Getting Students to Care About Their Learning" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(45) "getting-students-to-care-about-their-learning" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 17:37:27" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 17:37:27" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(33) "http://kpcrossacademy.org/?p=1286" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [1]=> object(WP_Post)#8003 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(1221) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-12-09 00:42:35" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-12-09 00:42:35" ["post_content"]=> string(4189) "“Knowledge without application is like a book that is never read” ~Christopher Crawford As college teachers, we want students to think deeply about course content and skills, yet sometimes it feels like students never progress beyond surface-level understanding. One of the best ways to help students get to deeper learning is to have them use what they have learned in a new way. In his taxonomy of Significant Learning, Fink (2013) suggests that application means learning how to do some new kind of action. In his taxonomy, Bloom suggests that application means students take what they’ve learned and apply it to a different scenario, often one outside of the classroom. For example, students could use a math formula they’ve learned to calculate a family budget or apply a legal ruling to a specific case in news headlines. To make sure that students show they can apply what they learn, consider the following suggestions:
                                    Be explicit about application
                                    When engaging students in activities that promote the application of knowledge to new contexts, instructors should feel free to make their learning goals and expectations clear. Students will practice application better when they learn to recognize it. They will likely more willingly engage if the instructor explains the benefits of application for future learning and even career aspirations.
                                    Focus on core concepts
                                    Students can more effectively apply knowledge when they comprehend the core principles behind the content and skills that they need to use. You can develop activities to help students develop a deeper understanding of relationships, shared functions, or similar organizing principles prior to asking students to apply the material in new contexts.
                                    Identify sub skills
                                    Asking students to apply what they have learned can sound like a fairly easy task to accomplish, but in reality, it is complicated, and students may not have developed the skills they need to do it well. They need skills in differentiating, classifying, categorizing, organizing, and making attributions. They also need problem solving. It can be useful to scaffold application to highlight the subtasks until students become more comfortable with and clear on their roles and responsibilities.
                                    Provide students with practice
                                    Students develop the ability to apply their learning by practicing application. Instructors can present two different scenarios, formulas, or readings and ask students to find single approaches for solving or analyzing each. Alternately, they can ask students to construct a different problem or scenario that requires the same skills and knowledge as a pre-completed assignment.
                                    Make it social and collaborative
                                    Application of knowledge can be particularly effective when it is done in a cooperative social context that allows peers to develop explanations, provide each other with feedback, and share responsibility for learning. 
                                    Involve students in the process
                                    Students will be more invested in applying what they have learned if they are called upon to mindfully and explicitly search for ways to make connections, to classify, to sort, and so on. Likewise, they will be more invested if called upon to self monitor their progress and success in applying information in new ways. Self-reflection and self-assessment are great tools for accomplishing this goal. For information about active learning techniques that prompt students to apply knowledge, see our videos for the following techniques:  " ["post_title"]=> string(65) "Getting Students to Apply What They Have Learned in a New Context" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(65) "getting-students-to-apply-what-they-have-learned-in-a-new-context" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 17:37:38" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 17:37:38" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(33) "http://kpcrossacademy.org/?p=1221" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [2]=> object(WP_Post)#8005 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(6415) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "5" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2021-10-12 07:00:17" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2021-10-12 14:00:17" ["post_content"]=> string(4436) "
                                    It’s been said that the best tool is the one you actually have with you, but how useful that tool is really comes down to whether or not you know best how to use it. Bearing that in mind, this post is aimed at helping you best utilize the online teaching resources provided by the K. Patricia Cross Academy.
                                    Video Sort Features
                                    With a library of 50 technique videos covering a wide range of subject matter, seeking out a specific video never requires more than a few clicks when using the library’s advanced sorting features.  Even better, the filters are applied in real-time for a smoother browsing experience! Teaching Environment The broadest filter, ‘Teaching Environment’ allows you to select videos based on the intended teaching environment—in-person or online—and is a great way to lend a bit of direction to your general library browsing. Activity Type Do you already have a particular activity type in mind? If you’re looking to approach a certain lesson element in a different way, the ‘Activity Type’ filter allows for efficient browsing and discovery of videos covering activity-specific techniques as well as the resources needed to implement them into your lessons. Teaching Problem Addressed Looking for a way to target a specific issue you’re facing in the classroom? The ‘Teaching Problem Addressed’ filter allows you to find videos directly related to the various teaching challenges you face. Learning Taxonomic Dimension Great for organizing videos based on how they address individual elements of the broader learning process, the ‘Learning Taxonomic Dimension’ filter categorizes the entire video library according to which broader piece of the learning puzzle they address. 
                                    Online Teaching Technique Videos
                                    As the pandemic has dramatically accelerated the adoption of—and reliance on—online learning environments, tailoring teaching techniques to best utilize (and accommodate) the medium has become an essential skill for ensuring teaching and learning do not suffer outside of traditional learning environments. In order to help aid the transition, 38 online teaching technique videos (and counting) have been adapted to offer resources and instruction tailored specifically to the unique considerations presented by teaching and learning in an online environment. 
                                    Subscribe to Our Newsletter
                                    From topical insights on the issues facing today’s educators to more detailed discussions of some of the finer points of various teaching techniques, our monthly newsletter has been designed to deliver a wealth of tips, strategies, and knowledge directly to your inbox for FREE!

                                      We're Here For You—And The Future of Higher Education
                                      The K. Patricia Cross Academy is dedicated to supporting faculty in their effort to develop effective, high-impact teaching techniques that improve students' learning through an evidence-based approach.
                                      Our instructional videos and downloadable resources have been designed to help both faculty and students, and they also represent our continued investment in the future of higher education. We hope these resources will help you in your efforts to teach both effectively and efficiently.
                                      " ["post_title"]=> string(69) "3 Tips For Making the Most of Cross Academy Online Teaching Resources" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(44) "3-tips-for-making-the-most-of-kpca-resources" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2021-10-12 10:37:30" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2021-10-12 17:37:30" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(34) "https://kpcrossacademy.org/?p=6415" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [3]=> object(WP_Post)#7993 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(2588) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "1" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-09-09 11:00:45" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-09-09 11:00:45" ["post_content"]=> string(9963) "

                                      Higher education institutions have been scrambling to meet the demand for remote and online courses. This has been due in part to general growth trends in online enrollment, but it has also been accelerated out of response to the Covid-19 pandemic. Because of this, we have focused on helping faculty teach more effectively online.

                                      In this blog, we turn our attention to the learning experiences these courses provide students. Understanding students' experiences in online courses has implications on the effectiveness of teaching strategies. A look at published research shows several factors related to the quality of student experiences that faculty can address when developing their online courses.

                                      Research on Student Experiences Online

                                      Instructor Availability and Accessibility

                                      Instructor accessibility is an important theme that emerges in research on student experiences of online learning. Students who have positive experiences tend to describe instructors as “being there,” “being quick to respond,” “responding within 24 hours,” and “bending over backwards to help.” They also share that instructors who are readily available are helpful to their learning and that they appreciate that these instructors are accessible for answering questions. Students describe these instructors as being clear and as communicating frequently.

                                      Unfortunately, not all students have positive experiences with their online instructors. Students say their learning suffers when their professors are absent. Students with negative experiences in online learning describe their instructors as, “quite invisible” and “you didn’t see them.” Instructor absence makes students feel that the professors are “not interested in us,” and thus the students are less likely to approach them for help or to ask any questions. This leaves students feeling that their instructor does not think that they or their learning is important.

                                      Instructors should consider how to make themselves present and available when teaching online.  There are many ways to be there for students in online courses. For example, you can include a welcome, add your bio, contribute to discussions, and give timely feedback on student work.

                                      Student Time Management

                                      One of the most valuable skills online students can have is effective time management. The better that students manage their learning time, the easier it is for them to achieve their learning goals. Without the camaraderie of a class to motivate them or having a set time where they need to be on campus, effective time management is crucial to staying focused. Those who have good skills in this area tend to feel prepared for online learning and tend to feel that they can manage and learn online.

                                      Some students express concern about their abilities to manage their time in online courses, however. When they come into online learning without effective time management skills, they may not remember to log in. They may not work sufficiently in advance to meet deadlines. Indeed, they may forget deadlines altogether. Obviously, lacking these essential skills can have a negative effect on their learning. Having an instructor who can help them, however, can mitigate the lack of skills.

                                      Instructors should think through how to help students better time manage and how to help them develop the skills to do so. Consider using Lecture Engagement Logs. These are records that guide students in documenting the work they should be doing before, during, and after a lecture, but they can easily be adapted to scaffold work in conjunction with other course activities.

                                      Lecture Engagement Logs View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:

                                      Collaborative Learning

                                      Many students who are learning online want opportunities to connect with peers, and for good reason. One of the challenges students most often describe attending their learning online is the feeling of “isolation.” One student described such feelings as follows:

                                      I feel isolated; I do not know my fellow learners well and I do not have the courage to phone them, to see if they feel the same distress as me, the same fears. I do not even dare to phone my instructor…The nature of distance learning makes me see everything from a distance.

                                      Another student in an online course said this, “I haven’t talked with much of anybody this semester” and another said they “didn’t feel connected.” Another put it this way: “I have felt it . . . panic. . . isolation . . . frustration . . . anger.” Instances of isolation are often related to lack of communication or connection in the online classroom. Clearly these feelings can have a negative effect on student learning.

                                      Students themselves appear to recognize that the social connection is critical to their learning. One student explained it this way:

                                      It was pretty important to know that there were people out there who were feeling the same thing … It was a little bit scary. I was thinking can I do it; can’t I do it? … This might sound a little bit perverse, but it was reassuring to know that other people were feeling the same thing; that it was quite normal.

                                      Students recognize that not only is the connection with the instructor important then, but it is also important that they establish and maintain connection with each other.

                                      So, what is to be done? Collaborative learning involves two or more people working in a group to learn something together. Students who participate in collaborative learning capitalize on one another's knowledge and skills. Usually, students working collaboratively search for understanding or meaning, solutions to problems, or they create a product. Collaborative learning tasks vary widely, but most often, they center on students’ exploration or application of the course material. Collaborative learning, at least on low stakes activities, can be critical in an online course. Consider for example trying a Jigsaw in your online course. In Jigsaw, students work in small groups to develop knowledge about a given topic before teaching what they have learned to another group.

                                      Jigsaw View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
                                      Conclusion

                                      In conclusion, students take online courses for a number of reasons, and in the middle of a global pandemic, one of those reasons is that they simply have to in order to continue their education. Several factors influence their experience, some of which faculty have direct influence over. Instructors should work to establish presence in the absence of physical co-presence, work to help students manage their time and efforts in learning, and strive to create a sense of community.

                                      Reference:

                                      Blackmon, S. J. & Major, C. H. (2012). Student experiences in online courses: A qualitative research synthesis. Quarterly Review of Distance Education, 13(2), 77-85.

                                      " ["post_title"]=> string(61) "What Do We Know About Student Experiences of Online Learning?" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(60) "what-do-we-know-about-student-experiences-of-online-learning" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2022-01-07 15:05:27" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2022-01-07 23:05:27" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(34) "https://kpcrossacademy.org/?p=2588" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [4]=> object(WP_Post)#7996 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(2688) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "5" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-11-10 07:02:20" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-11-10 07:02:20" ["post_content"]=> string(9647) "Active learning has come of age in higher education, with many educators adopting this method of teaching in their courses and with many studies documenting its effectiveness as an instructional approach. But what is active learning anyway? And given the fact that so many of us are teaching online, what does it look like in an online course? Descriptions of active learning in general are broad and imprecise. Several commonly cited definitions of active learning are as follows:
                                      • Anything that involves students in doing things and thinking about the things they are doing (Bonwell & Eison, 1991).
                                      • A process whereby students engage in activities, such as reading, writing, discussion, or problem solving that promote analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of class content (University of Michigan, Center for Research on Teaching and Learning, 2016)
                                      • A process of learning through activities and/or discussion in class, as opposed to passively listening to an expert. It emphasizes higher-order thinking and often involves group work (Freeman, et al., 2014).
                                      We have argued for a broader understanding of active learning than simply associating the term with an instructional approach, activity, or technique in several books in the College Teaching Techniques series. In so doing, we suggested that active learning involves making students dynamic participants in their own learning in ways that require them to integrate new information into their personal knowledge and experience. We suspect that what promotes active learning is different for different learners, but in general, we suggest that students are active learners when they are engaged in their learning in one or more of the following ways.

                                      Students are active learners when they:

                                      • Use sophisticated learning strategies
                                      • Seek deep, conceptual understanding rather than surface knowledge
                                      • Use learning strategies with personal relevance
                                      • Use self-regulatory and metacognitive strategies
                                      • Seek to share personal perspectives
                                      • Seek to understand others’ perspectives
                                      • Demonstrate curiosity, interest, and enthusiasm
                                      • Offer input or suggestions
                                      •  Seek out additional and further opportunities for learning
                                      Although active learning can happen anywhere and at any time, we propose that when identifying an approach to promote active learning in a college course, teachers should consider two components: a learning task and a goal for the level of activity involved. By learning task, we mean an academic activity that an instructor has intentionally designed for students to do to help them meet important learning outcomes. We believe that the task can include listening to a lecture; after all, there is a body of work on active listening. The challenge is to make sure that students are using those higher-level listening skills, rather than just hearing the facts. That brings us to our second construct, level of activity, by which we mean students’ mental investment and the strategies they use to reflect on and monitor the processes and the results of their learning. Level of activity is a discrete component because one type of learning task does not necessarily demand more mental investment than another; rather, each type of learning task can require more or less mental activity depending on the individual learner as well as the content and design of the specific task. For example, although some educators argue that students who are listening to a lecture are necessarily learning more passively than those who are solving problems, consider the following problem: X + 3 = 5. Most college students can solve this problem without too much mental activity.
                                      However, college students who are listening carefully to a highly engaging lecture can have high levels of mental activity, including focused attention, curiosity, empathy, critical thinking, and so forth. Thus, students can have low to high levels of mental activity in any given learning task and any given learning task can require and result in more or less active learning from students.
                                      We offer our own conception of the active learning continuum for several key learning tasks in the following Table:   Viewed in this way, the term active learning can and should include the learning that can occur when students are listening to a lecture. If students learn something during a lecture, they have been mentally active, whether through listening, remembering, questioning, contemplating, or other. They likely have also been involved in activities such as note-taking, and in our model of interactive lectures, they will participate in additional activities, such as discussing and problem-solving. The challenge, then, is to help students move from level 1 (low) to level 3 (high) on the continuum in terms of their mental activity, whatever the learning task happens to be. So what does this look like online? We suggest that the mechanism itself is much the same as it is onsite. Faculty should choose the task, select a technique that helps students achieve the learning goal with a high level of mental activity (which you can do by sorting our videos by activity type.) To get started, consider the following active learning techniques:
                                      Active Reading Documents
                                      Carefully prepared forms that guide students through the process of critical and careful reading. View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
                                      Online Resource Scavenger Hunt
                                      Students use the internet to engage in fact-finding and information processing exercises using instructor-specified library and Internet sources. View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
                                      Quick Write
                                      Quick Write is a learning assessment technique where learners respond to an open-ended prompt. View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
                                      Case Studies
                                      In Case Studies student teams review a real-life problem scenario in depth. Team members apply course concepts to identify and evaluate alternative approaches to solving the problem. View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
                                      Thus, we encourage faculty who are new to teaching online to put pedagogy first and to be very intentional in their efforts to promote active learning. That is, consider what the learning goal is, what the learning task is, and what technique you can use to accomplish it. After you make these determinations, next you can consider what tool can facilitate your teaching and promote active learning most effectively. To sign up for our newsletter, where you will receive information about new blog posts, click here:

                                        Reference Barkley, E. F., & Major, C. H. (2018). Interactive lecturing: A handbook for college faculty. San Francisco: Jossey Bass/Wiley." ["post_title"]=> string(48) "4 Techniques to Encourage Active Learning Online" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(22) "active-learning-online" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-12-01 00:11:03" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-12-01 00:11:03" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(34) "https://kpcrossacademy.org/?p=2688" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [5]=> object(WP_Post)#7997 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(472) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2018-11-26 21:34:26" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2018-11-26 21:34:26" ["post_content"]=> string(1524) "Creating or revising a syllabus can be fun. You get to think through what students should learn in the course, what content they will review, what skills they will practice, and what assignments they will complete during the term. One of the most tedious aspects of creating or revising a syllabus, though, is figuring out and filling in the dates each semester, particularly if you have a class that meets, or in the case of online courses has assignments due, multiple times a week. Cue the generic syllabus date finder, created by Caleb McDaniel and hosted on the Rice University Web site at the following URL: http://wcaleb.rice.edu/syllabusmaker/generic/ This simple tool will prompt you to enter the year of your course, the start and end date, and the days on which you will meet (or have work due from students). Once you fill in the relevant information, hitting “submit” will result in a list of dates for the term and will save you the time of having to find them on a calendar. We hope you find this tool useful! As always, if you know of an interesting resource that we should feature, please drop us a line at info@kpcrossacademy.org; we will of course credit you for the information you share." ["post_title"]=> string(31) "It's Not Always in the Syllabus" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(30) "its-not-always-in-the-syllabus" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 17:59:33" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 17:59:33" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(32) "https://kpci.wpengine.com/?p=472" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [6]=> object(WP_Post)#7999 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(3677) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "3" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2021-03-10 07:00:03" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2021-03-10 15:00:03" ["post_content"]=> string(8959) "The COVID-19 pandemic and its surrounding political climate find us all in a time of crisis. Teachers and students alike are often caring for family members, friends, and themselves. That students are doing so while continuing their studies demonstrates that they do care, and they likely care deeply, for the people in their lives. But with the distractions brought about during this time of crisis, it can be a challenge for them to focus their care additionally on their studies. As educators, we know there is a strong relationship between caring about learning and quality of learning. As Fink argues, “When students care about something, they then have the energy they need for learning more about it and making it a part of their lives. Without the energy for learning, nothing significant happens” (2013, p. 360). It seems simple common sense that students who really care about what they are learning will invest the time and effort required to learn it well and remember it longer. So how do we help students focus their care on learning, during a crisis, during an age of significant distraction?
                                        What Does Caring Mean During a Crisis?
                                        When we care about something, we have acquired an affective disposition toward it that combines concern and perhaps even affection: we value it, appreciate it, and anticipate opportunities to encounter it.  “Caring” in education refers to the degree to which students are interested in, or have feelings about, various aspects of their learning, and it can apply to an array of foci that include topic-specific phenomena and ideas, human beings, and the process of learning itself. It means the focusing of consciousness and the narrowing of attention on learning We often know when students care about their learning. If students care about a course, they will show up for it and will invest appropriate time and energy into the learning activities.  If students care about their peers, they will listen actively when others speak and demonstrate compassion and empathy as they develop deeper understanding of another’s perspectives or experiences. If students care about the topic, they will ask pertinent questions and be sufficiently curious to go beyond the minimum class requirements. How does all this work when they simply don’t have the physical stamina, time, cognitive bandwidth, or emotional energy for the learning?
                                        How Do We Get Students to Care about Learning during a Crisis?
                                        Following are suggestions for promoting caring in college and university courses during a crisis: 1. Acknowledge the Crisis and How You are Addressing It. It will help students to care if they know that you care, too, and that you understand where they are coming from. Tell them how you have adapted the course or activities and explain how you hope they will adapt in turn. 2. Humanize the Course. Particularly if you are teaching online, make sure that you have a warm and inviting space for students. You also need to be there and show your personality. Helping students to make connections with you and with each other builds community in the class and can help students to care more about their own work. Being there and forming that community is likely the most essential element of caring in a time of crisis. 3. Reconsider Rigor. Rigor is important, but be sure that you aren’t focusing excessively on it. It’s important to balance rigor with being supportive of students and their learning during this time. Think through how you can provide a quality learning experience during these unique circumstances. Students are more likely to care if they believe that you aren’t out to prove how tough you and the course are, but instead are doing your best to ensure they learn. 4. Make it Manageable. Provide a clear structure and a clear schedule. Give students challenges that increase in difficulty incrementally. One reason that students fail to care is that they believe that they can't or won’t be successful. One way to negate that is to give them small challenges so they can be successful in completing them and then build difficulty and complexity over time. 5. Stay Positive. There are many things to be negative about right now, but your course, content, and student learning aren’t part of that. You can help ensure that students care by staying positive about the learning. Consider using positive language, for example, talking about what they will gain from the course and how they will use it in the future or when we return to the “new normal.” 6. Provide Students with Choice and Autonomy. Provide students with choices so that they feel more invested. For example, you might let students choose which discussions to participate in, or you might give them options about how to participate, for example by sharing something they have created or by responding to a prompt with an essay. 7. Make sure Tasks are Relevant, Appropriate, and Worthy of Their Attention. Characteristics of a learning task can increase or decrease student caring. For example, consider the following questions: Is the task inherently interesting? Is it important to the students on a personal level? Can they make a connection between the task and their own lived experiences? Is there some novelty to it? Is the purpose clear? Is it important to them? Is it a creative activity? Is there enough time to successfully complete the task?
                                        Cross Academy Techniques to Promote Caring
                                        Consider the following techniques that promote caring and also provide students with ways to demonstrate caring about the topic or their learning: Three-Minute Message: 3-Minute Messages are modeled on the Three-Minute Thesis (3MT) academic competition, in which students have three minutes to present a compelling argument and to support it with convincing details and examples. View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
                                        Briefing Paper: In a Briefing Paper, students research a current problem of their choice, summarize the main issues, and present solutions to a specific audience. View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
                                        What? So What? Now What? Journals: In What? So What? Now What? Journals, students reflect on their recent course-related activities as they respond to each prompt in a journal entry. View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
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                                          " ["post_title"]=> string(68) "7 Steps to Help Students Care About Learning During a Time of Crisis" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(41) "helping-students-care-in-a-time-of-crisis" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2021-03-10 09:28:09" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2021-03-10 17:28:09" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(34) "https://kpcrossacademy.org/?p=3677" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [7]=> object(WP_Post)#7974 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(2179) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "5" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-07-08 01:39:18" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-07-08 01:39:18" ["post_content"]=> string(11234) "After years - even decades - of teaching onsite, many instructors are able to teach a traditional, classroom-based course without having laid out the entire course in advance. This approach doesn’t work well in the online classroom, however, as online course delivery requires more fully developing the course ahead of time. Thus, when teaching online, the process of course design is essential. Online course design requires a wide range of skills and tools and managing both the design and the technical aspects of the course. A Brief Overview of Online Course Design When engaging in course design, the concept of instructional alignment is useful to consider. Instructional alignment begins with the identification of learning goals. Those goals then direct other decisions, including how you will help students achieve these goals (materials and methods), what tools can best help you help students achieve them (technologies), and how you will know if the goals have been met (assessment). We illustrate the idea of instructional alignment in online courses in the following figure: In this model, one element leads to the next. For example, if you are teaching an English class, you might have a learning goal of critical thinking, with a specific objective that learners will critically evaluate a play. Your learning materials might include the specific play to be evaluated as well as an article or chapter describing a model of critical evaluation. For your learning activities, you might ask learners to read the materials and then practice critical evaluation through Active Reading Documents in which your questions lead students through a critical analysis that prepares them to then write a report on their own. For the technology, you might use a Learning Management System (LMS) and have the materials available within it as well as a downloadable template for the Active Reading Documents. For the assessment, students might write a formal report using the evaluation model to critically evaluate the play. All of these key elements in the instructional alignment model should be determined before an online course goes live. The following are tips related to instructional alignment during course design. 1. Develop Course and Module Learning Goals and Objectives Most of us are familiar with the idea of developing course goals and objectives; after all, we usually have to include course level goals and objectives in every syllabus we create. But not all of us are as familiar with developing goals for specific learning modules. When we teach online, developing, and then displaying more targeted micro-goals for specific modules helps make our learning expectations clear. 2. Use Multiple Media for Learning Materials Traditionally, many of us share content by asking students to read a chapter or article and then we elaborate by presenting additional content through lectures. We can accomplish these forms of sharing content in similar ways online. Many resources are available to present text versions of lectures, and we can also present either synchronous lectures through video conferencing or asynchronous pre-recorded video lectures online. In addition, there are a range of free resources available online, such as pre-recorded videos and free open educational resources (OERs). A mix of media (text, video, audio, graphics) is typically more effective than using only one type because the variety can help keep students more engaged. 3. Choose Appropriate Learning Tasks It is important to think through what students will do in your online course. Common instructional tasks in online courses include the following:
                                          • Connect—Activate students’ prior knowledge of the content so that learners can make better connections to new content through an activity such as a Background Knowledge Probe.
                                          • Learn/Watch/Read— Provide learners with the new content.
                                          • Practice—Implement activities that reinforce their new learning.
                                          • Share/Discuss—Enable students to find personal relevance and share their experiences with their peers, perhaps through a discussion thread. Consider for example using a Think-Pair-Share.
                                          • Assess—Ask students to demonstrate learning, whether through a quiz, assignment, project, or other.
                                          • Reflect— Challenge students to reflect on what they have learned.
                                          Aim for having the same kinds of activities due on the same days of the week. If for example, you do a discussion board each week, choose the day when students will post (for example have discussions due on Wednesday and responses due on Friday). If they have an assessment to complete each week, choose a different due day for that activity (for example, have the assessment due on Thursday), and so forth. 4. Humanize the Technology Technology can serve as a mediator between people. A few suggestions for accomplishing this are as follows:
                                          • Simplify the NavigationMany Learning Management Systems make choices for you, including what will be in the navigation bar. Think through how students will work their way through the course and what students really need to see in the navigation menu. Unnecessary items can result in overwhelmed students. Providing clarity and ensuring intuitive organization of materials can improve learner satisfaction as well as promoting deeper learning.
                                          • Strive for a Humanized Look and FeelThere is a tendency in online courses to use built-in icons and heavy text. Graphics, images, and short videos can create a warmer look and a more human-friendly feel to the course.
                                          • Ensure Accessibility—Effective online courses should be accessible to all learners. One way to do this is to make sure courses are “universally designed.” Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is built on the idea that all learning experiences should be purposefully constructed to be “barrier free” and accessible by providing multiple and flexible methods of the following elements:
                                            • Presentation of content (e.g., voice-to-text applications, screen readers, digital books).
                                            • Alternatives for students to demonstrate what they have learned (e.g., concept mapping).
                                            • Engagement to tap into diverse learners’ interests, challenge them appropriately, and motivate them to learn (choices among various scenarios for learning the same competency).
                                          5. Include Multiple Learning Assessments While one assessment alone can generate evidence to make decisions about student learning and development, multiple measures encourage more comprehensive and accurate assessment. This benefits not only the students who are learning but also the instructors who are doing the teaching. Consider the following learning artifacts commonly used to assess student learning in online courses.
                                          • Discussion Posts
                                          • Groupwork Products
                                          • Quizzes
                                          • Exams
                                          • Written or Video Assignments
                                          • Digital Projects or Portfolios
                                          Consider providing students with choices for assignments, such as what to write about for the assignment or how to respond to a discussion post or even which assignments they will complete. In conclusion, online course design requires concerted time and attention. To summarize some of the key points we have described, we have further developed our instructional alignment figure for online courses as follows: Try incorporating these teaching techniques into your online course design.

                                          Background Knowledge Probe

                                          View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:

                                          Think Pair Share

                                          View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:

                                          Active Reading Documents

                                          View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
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                                            " ["post_title"]=> string(40) "5 Tips for Engaging Online Course Design" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(29) "engaging-online-course-design" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-07-10 00:53:56" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-07-10 00:53:56" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(34) "https://kpcrossacademy.org/?p=2179" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [8]=> object(WP_Post)#7930 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(816) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "4" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-05-09 19:26:20" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-05-09 19:26:20" ["post_content"]=> string(1570) "“Learning is not attained by chance, it must be sought for with ardor and attended to with diligence.” ~ Abigal Adams One of the most often cited works on learning, and one we refer to often, is John Bransford, Ann Brown, and Rodney Cocking’s 2000 work appropriately titled How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School. The report, which was commissioned by the National Research Council, presents research in cognitive science and connects the findings to implications for teaching and learning. You can find the full report, all 374 pages of it, here: https://www.nap.edu/read/9853/chapter/1 Helpfully, the staff at the Center for Teaching at Vanderbilt University have developed a teaching guide with highlights from the report. For their summary, see the following link: https://cft.vanderbilt.edu//cft/guides-sub-pages/how-people-learn/ The CFT staff hone in on the nature of expertise and the challenges students face as they seek to develop expertise. The staff suggest that teachers should seek to gauge student levels of knowledge and that we should also make our thinking visible to students so that we are modeling our expertise. We hope that you find these resources helpful. As always, if you know of an interesting resource that we should feature, please drop us a line at info@kpcrossacademy.org; we will of course credit you for the information you share.  " ["post_title"]=> string(14) "How They Learn" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(14) "how-they-learn" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 17:38:41" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 17:38:41" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(32) "http://kpcrossacademy.org/?p=816" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [9]=> object(WP_Post)#7648 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(1575) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "4" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 02:42:22" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-04-23 02:42:22" ["post_content"]=> string(9211) "The COVID-19 pandemic has led to many if not most college faculty teaching in virtual classrooms. While many of us are turning to synchronous lectures with video conferencing tools such as Zoom or Blackboard Collaborate, many of us are also choosing to create asynchronous video lectures that students can watch anytime, anywhere. There are many valid reasons for making this teach-from-home choice; among them are some students may have difficulty accessing synchronous class activities—they may be living in a different time zone, have limited internet access, among other reasons. The benefits of an asynchronous e-classroom setup, beyond time and place flexibility, include the fact that students can scan, search, and re-watch lectures. Moreover, as faculty, you have the luxury of time to think fully through what you are going to say ahead of time and afterward, to edit the videos so that you produce the best e-lecture product possible. A few effective ways to use asynchronous videos are:
                                            • A welcome video
                                            • An introduction to a topic or module
                                            • A demonstration
                                            • A description of a difficult concept
                                            • A synthesis of material from the learning module or unit
                                            A few choices that you have for creating videos at home on your phone or laptop are as follows:
                                            • Narrated slide presentation. In this video format, slides are the only thing visible in the video. The teacher does a voiceover to accompany the slides. These are useful for presenting complicated material for which visuals will likely enhance students’ understanding. PowerPoint has a built-in feature for recording over slides, but it can be clunky to have to click play between each slide. A better option is to export to YouTube or Vimeo or use a screencast program such as Screencastomatic or Screencastify that you can also share to YouTube or Vimeo.
                                            • Presenter-only lecture. In this kind of lecture, the instructor appears without other visual supports. This approach can make the instructor appear as a mere talking head if overdone. But they can be useful in short segments to add teacher presence to the course and help students feel like you are “there.” These can be done in a fairly low-tech way, such as through a smartphone video, Zoom, or Blackboard Collaborate recording done ahead of time.
                                            • Slide presentation with presenter view. This approach is a combination of presenter and slide presentation, which allows you to capitalize on the benefits of both approaches. Programs such as Panopto and Tegrity provide a professional look, but you can also record in Zoom or other video conferencing programs ahead of time.
                                            To create the most engaging asynchronous video presentations possible, be sure that you attend to the following issues:
                                            1. Lighting: Make sure that you have ample lighting and that the light hits your face rather than coming from behind you.
                                            2. Storyboards: If you are doing the lecture for the first time, consider creating a storyboard, which is simply a plan of what you will say, show, and describe. A good storyboard can provide you with a roadmap. Feel free to download and use our template.
                                            3. Scripts: Develop a script of what you will say to ensure that you address the most important content. You can then use the script as the transcript of the video for accessibility purposes. If you would like to be more impromptu in your approach but need to create a transcript, consider using a program like Zoom that will allow you to record and change the settings to prepare a transcript, which you can then edit.
                                            4. Slide Design. See our blog post on creating engaging synchronous lectures for tips on effective slide design for video lectures.
                                            5. Copyright: Because your video will be tangible and long lasting, you need to ensure that you have permission to use all images, video, music, or other content that is not your own. You can find many free images and music through sources such as Creative Commons, Unsplash, or Pixabay. Just be sure to give credit where credit is due.
                                            6. Shelf-Life: You may well want to use the video you create in the future, and you will be better able to do so if you are attentive to the shelf life of your content. While it may be virtually impossible not to mention the Coronavirus pandemic, consider limiting such references so that you are able to edit the information out later.
                                            7. Learning Chunks: It is exceedingly difficult to watch long lectures, particularly on video. Try to break your lectures into no more than 10-minute chunks per video. If you simply cannot do this, consider asking students to stop the video to complete a task every 10 minutes.
                                            8. Active Learning: While the video will be asynchronous, you can and should still expect students to learn actively while they are watching. Consider implementing the following techniques in your online class to break up your asynchronous video lecture and keep your students active and engaged:
                                            • Guided Notes | View Technique →
                                            • Quick WriteView Technique →
                                            " ["post_title"]=> string(65) "Creating Engaging Asynchronous Lectures With Your Phone or Laptop" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(39) "creating-engaging-asynchronous-lectures" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-05-19 16:42:33" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-05-19 16:42:33" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(33) "http://kpcrossacademy.org/?p=1575" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } } ["post_count"]=> int(10) ["current_post"]=> int(4) ["in_the_loop"]=> bool(true) ["post"]=> object(WP_Post)#7996 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(2688) ["post_author"]=> string(1) "5" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-11-10 07:02:20" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-11-10 07:02:20" ["post_content"]=> string(9647) "Active learning has come of age in higher education, with many educators adopting this method of teaching in their courses and with many studies documenting its effectiveness as an instructional approach. But what is active learning anyway? And given the fact that so many of us are teaching online, what does it look like in an online course? Descriptions of active learning in general are broad and imprecise. Several commonly cited definitions of active learning are as follows:
                                            • Anything that involves students in doing things and thinking about the things they are doing (Bonwell & Eison, 1991).
                                            • A process whereby students engage in activities, such as reading, writing, discussion, or problem solving that promote analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of class content (University of Michigan, Center for Research on Teaching and Learning, 2016)
                                            • A process of learning through activities and/or discussion in class, as opposed to passively listening to an expert. It emphasizes higher-order thinking and often involves group work (Freeman, et al., 2014).
                                            We have argued for a broader understanding of active learning than simply associating the term with an instructional approach, activity, or technique in several books in the College Teaching Techniques series. In so doing, we suggested that active learning involves making students dynamic participants in their own learning in ways that require them to integrate new information into their personal knowledge and experience. We suspect that what promotes active learning is different for different learners, but in general, we suggest that students are active learners when they are engaged in their learning in one or more of the following ways.

                                            Students are active learners when they:

                                            • Use sophisticated learning strategies
                                            • Seek deep, conceptual understanding rather than surface knowledge
                                            • Use learning strategies with personal relevance
                                            • Use self-regulatory and metacognitive strategies
                                            • Seek to share personal perspectives
                                            • Seek to understand others’ perspectives
                                            • Demonstrate curiosity, interest, and enthusiasm
                                            • Offer input or suggestions
                                            •  Seek out additional and further opportunities for learning
                                            Although active learning can happen anywhere and at any time, we propose that when identifying an approach to promote active learning in a college course, teachers should consider two components: a learning task and a goal for the level of activity involved. By learning task, we mean an academic activity that an instructor has intentionally designed for students to do to help them meet important learning outcomes. We believe that the task can include listening to a lecture; after all, there is a body of work on active listening. The challenge is to make sure that students are using those higher-level listening skills, rather than just hearing the facts. That brings us to our second construct, level of activity, by which we mean students’ mental investment and the strategies they use to reflect on and monitor the processes and the results of their learning. Level of activity is a discrete component because one type of learning task does not necessarily demand more mental investment than another; rather, each type of learning task can require more or less mental activity depending on the individual learner as well as the content and design of the specific task. For example, although some educators argue that students who are listening to a lecture are necessarily learning more passively than those who are solving problems, consider the following problem: X + 3 = 5. Most college students can solve this problem without too much mental activity.
                                            However, college students who are listening carefully to a highly engaging lecture can have high levels of mental activity, including focused attention, curiosity, empathy, critical thinking, and so forth. Thus, students can have low to high levels of mental activity in any given learning task and any given learning task can require and result in more or less active learning from students.
                                            We offer our own conception of the active learning continuum for several key learning tasks in the following Table:   Viewed in this way, the term active learning can and should include the learning that can occur when students are listening to a lecture. If students learn something during a lecture, they have been mentally active, whether through listening, remembering, questioning, contemplating, or other. They likely have also been involved in activities such as note-taking, and in our model of interactive lectures, they will participate in additional activities, such as discussing and problem-solving. The challenge, then, is to help students move from level 1 (low) to level 3 (high) on the continuum in terms of their mental activity, whatever the learning task happens to be. So what does this look like online? We suggest that the mechanism itself is much the same as it is onsite. Faculty should choose the task, select a technique that helps students achieve the learning goal with a high level of mental activity (which you can do by sorting our videos by activity type.) To get started, consider the following active learning techniques:
                                            Active Reading Documents
                                            Carefully prepared forms that guide students through the process of critical and careful reading. View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
                                            Online Resource Scavenger Hunt
                                            Students use the internet to engage in fact-finding and information processing exercises using instructor-specified library and Internet sources. View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
                                            Quick Write
                                            Quick Write is a learning assessment technique where learners respond to an open-ended prompt. View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
                                            Case Studies
                                            In Case Studies student teams review a real-life problem scenario in depth. Team members apply course concepts to identify and evaluate alternative approaches to solving the problem. View main video here: View Technique → View online adaptation here:
                                            Thus, we encourage faculty who are new to teaching online to put pedagogy first and to be very intentional in their efforts to promote active learning. That is, consider what the learning goal is, what the learning task is, and what technique you can use to accomplish it. After you make these determinations, next you can consider what tool can facilitate your teaching and promote active learning most effectively. To sign up for our newsletter, where you will receive information about new blog posts, click here:

                                              Reference Barkley, E. F., & Major, C. H. (2018). Interactive lecturing: A handbook for college faculty. San Francisco: Jossey Bass/Wiley." ["post_title"]=> string(48) "4 Techniques to Encourage Active Learning Online" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(22) "active-learning-online" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-12-01 00:11:03" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-12-01 00:11:03" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(34) "https://kpcrossacademy.org/?p=2688" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(4) "post" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } ["comment_count"]=> int(0) ["current_comment"]=> int(-1) ["found_posts"]=> int(35) ["max_num_pages"]=> float(4) ["max_num_comment_pages"]=> int(0) ["is_single"]=> bool(false) ["is_preview"]=> bool(false) ["is_page"]=> bool(false) ["is_archive"]=> bool(false) ["is_date"]=> bool(false) ["is_year"]=> bool(false) ["is_month"]=> bool(false) ["is_day"]=> bool(false) ["is_time"]=> bool(false) ["is_author"]=> bool(false) ["is_category"]=> bool(false) ["is_tag"]=> bool(false) ["is_tax"]=> bool(false) ["is_search"]=> bool(false) ["is_feed"]=> bool(false) ["is_comment_feed"]=> bool(false) ["is_trackback"]=> bool(false) ["is_home"]=> bool(true) ["is_privacy_policy"]=> bool(false) ["is_404"]=> bool(false) ["is_embed"]=> bool(false) ["is_paged"]=> bool(false) ["is_admin"]=> bool(false) ["is_attachment"]=> bool(false) ["is_singular"]=> bool(false) ["is_robots"]=> bool(false) ["is_favicon"]=> bool(false) ["is_posts_page"]=> bool(false) ["is_post_type_archive"]=> bool(false) ["query_vars_hash":"WP_Query":private]=> string(32) "624526c0adb57e738deaffa631df580d" ["query_vars_changed":"WP_Query":private]=> bool(false) ["thumbnails_cached"]=> bool(false) ["stopwords":"WP_Query":private]=> NULL ["compat_fields":"WP_Query":private]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(15) "query_vars_hash" [1]=> string(18) "query_vars_changed" } ["compat_methods":"WP_Query":private]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(16) "init_query_flags" [1]=> string(15) "parse_tax_query" } }